Ted's Sports Center - Reports
Welcome, Guest. Please create an account or sign in.
Please sign in to access your shopping cart.

Reports

HATCHERY RETURNS ON LOCAL RIVERS STILL BLEAK

posted by Mike on 01/17/2020

Here's a rundown on the number of hatchery steelhead that have returned to our local hatcheries as of January 16th. Here it is mid January and we are in big trouble, it is doubtful that we will meet our hatchery needs on our local rivers as the hatchery returns are nearing the end of their run timing.

 

Kendell Creek (Nooksack River) - 14

Whitehorse (N.F. Stillagumish River) - 20

Tokol Creek (Snoqualimie River) - 47

Wallace River (Skykomish River) - 11

Reiter Ponds (Skykomish River) - 20

 

This years returns are as bleak as I have ever seen, I am sure that the wild returns to all Washington Rivers will also be well below escapement goals. Very poor ocean conditions are with out a doubt the major culprit, though there are many other factors that have also contributed.

SIX DAY RAZOR CLAM DIG SCHEDULED FOR THE COAST JANUARY 21ST - 26TH

posted by Mike on 01/17/2020

WDFW approves a six-day razor clam dig starting Tuesday

OLYMPIA - Razor clam diggers can return to ocean beaches for six days of digging beginning Jan. 21.

State shellfish managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved a dig on evening low tides after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

The approved dig is for the following beaches, dates and low tides:

  • January 21, Tuesday, 4:23 pm -0.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • January 22, Wednesday, 5:10 pm -0.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • January 23, Thursday, 5:53 pm -0.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • January 24, Friday, 6:32 pm -0.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • January 25, Saturday, 7:08 pm -0.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • January 26, Sunday, 7:42 pm -0.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

     

No digging is allowed before noon for allowed digs, when low tide occurs in the evening.

"Weather and surf during our last opener dissuaded many from participating," said Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager. "The good news is that this means there are still a great many clams out there for this and future digs."

For a list of proposed razor clam digs on Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks beaches through February, please see our razor clam webpage

Ayres said additional tentative razor clam digs for March and later will be announced in early February.

WDFW authorizes each dig independently after getting the results of marine toxin testing. Final approval of the tentatively scheduled openings will depend on whether results of marine toxin tests show the clams are safe to eat.

In order to ensure conservation of clams for future generations, WDFW sets tentative razor clam seasons that are based on the results from an annual coast-wide razor clam stock assessment and by considering harvest to date. To see videos of WDFW's sustainable management work for razor clam seasons, visit our razor clam page.

WDFW is also asking razor clam fans around the state to weigh in on the perennial question: Which is better, clam gun or shovel? To register support for a favored digging method, clam diggers can post a photo or video, complete with hashtag #TeamClamShovel or #TeamClamGun on any social media before the end of the spring season.

Additional safety considerations are important this time of year. "Diggers want to be sure to come prepared with good lighting devices and always keep an eye on the surf, particularly at this time of year when low tides come at dusk and after dark," said Ayres. "Diggers can also start gathering clams an hour or two before the tide, which on some days allows folks to enjoy daylight for most of their time on the beach."

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2019-20 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container.

WDFW is the state agency tasked with preserving, protecting and perpetuating fish, wildlife and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing, hunting and other outdoor recreation opportunities.

NO STEELHEAD CATCH & RELEASE SEASON ON SKAGIT & SAUK RIVERS THIS SEASON

posted by Mike on 01/15/2020

Catch-and-release steelhead fishery will not open on Skagit, Sauk rivers amid projected low returns

OLYMPIA – With low numbers of wild steelhead projected to return to the Skagit Basin, fishery managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) announced today that the Skagit steelhead catch-and-release fishery will not open this year.

Only 3,963 wild adult steelhead are expected to return to the Skagit Basin this year from Puget Sound.

Wild Puget Sound steelhead have been listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) since 2007. When projected returns to the Skagit Basin are below 4,000 fish, the number of allowable impacts to those fish is substantially restricted, said Edward Eleazer, regional fish program manager for WDFW.

“When returns are this low, our management plan and the ESA permit require us to be extremely conservative with how these fish might be impacted by fishing activity,” Eleazer said. “We have to minimize those impacts to ensure we meet conservation objectives, and to allow for other fisheries that don’t target steelhead in the Skagit and Sauk rivers and Puget Sound.”

Most of the steelhead returning in 2020 are 4 or 5 years old, and the low returns are likely the result of severe drought and low river flows in 2015 and 2016, as well as an unprecedented marine heatwave in the Pacific Ocean that negatively affected survival rates.

The Skagit Basin was closed to wild steelhead fishing for several years before reopening for limited fisheries on the Skagit and Sauk rivers in 2018 and 2019. WDFW worked with tribal co-managers to develop a fishery plan and secure an ESA fishery permit to reopen.

WDFW and the tribes continue working to recover wild steelhead, protect habitat, and remove fish passage barriers to improve survival in Puget Sound.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is the state agency tasked with preserving, protecting, and perpetuating fish, wildlife, and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing, hunting, and other recreation opportunities.

OLYMPIC PENINSULA SALMON DERBY - MARCH 13,14,& 15 2020

posted by Mike on 01/06/2020

The Olympic Peninsula Salmon Derby will take place this year on March 13, 14 & 15. This is the most popular salmon derby of the Winter fisheries. Tickets will run $40.00 per person and will cover all there days of the derby. The major prizes are as follows:

 

!st Place $10,000

2nd Place $2,000

3rd Place $1,000

Four $500.00 Mystery Fish Prizes

Lots of additional merchandise prizes.

 

For Rules and Details go to www.GardinerSalmonDerby.org or www.facebook.com/SalmonDerby

WDFW APPROVES FIRST RAZOR CLAM DIGS OF THE NEW YEAR

posted by Mike on 01/04/2020

WDFW approves first razor clam digs of the decade

OLYMPIA - Razor clam diggers can return to ocean beaches for seven days of digging beginning Jan. 8.

State shellfish managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved a dig on evening low tides after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

The approved dig is for the following beaches, dates and low tides:

  • January 8, Wednesday, 5:05 pm -0.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • January 9, Thursday, 5:47 pm -0.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • January 10, Friday, 6:29 pm -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • January 11, Saturday, 7:11 pm -1.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • January 12, Sunday, 7:53 pm -1.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • January 13, Monday, 8:36 pm -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • January 14, Tuesday, 9:20 pm -0.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

No digging is allowed before noon for allowed digs, when low tide occurs in the evening.

“Our great razor clam digging is continuing right into the new year,” said Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager. “We saw some impressive harvest opportunities last year and expect more of the same to ring in 2020.”

In order to ensure conservation of clams for future generations, WDFW sets tentative razor clam seasons that are based on the results from an annual coast-wide razor clam stock assessment and by considering harvest to date.

WDFW is also asking razor clam fans around the state to weigh in on the perennial question: Which is better, clam gun or shovel? To register support for a favored digging method, clam diggers can post a photo or video, complete with hashtag #TeamClamShovel or #TeamClamGun on any social media before the end of the spring season.\

For a list of proposed razor clam digs on Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks beaches through February, please see our razor clam webpage at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfishing-regulations/razor-clams#current. WDFW authorizes each dig independently after getting the results of marine toxin testing. Final approval of the tentatively scheduled openings will depend on whether results of marine toxin tests show the clams are safe to eat.

Additional safety considerations are important this time of year. “Diggers want to be sure to come prepared with good lighting devices and always keep an eye on the surf, particularly at this time of year when low tides come at dusk and after dark,” said Ayres. “Diggers can also start gathering clams an hour or two before the tide, which on some days allows folks to enjoy daylight for most of their time on the beach.”

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2019-20 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container.

TEDS SPORTS CENTER GIFT CERTIFICATES - PLEASE REDEEM THEM

posted by Mike on 01/03/2020

As many of you already know, I am winding things down here at the shop and looking forward to retiring in the near future. So, if you happen to have any Ted's Gift Certificates collecting dust it's time to redeem them! If you have been saving it for some special item the time has come for you to cash it in.

14TH ANNUAL EVERETT BALCKMOUTH DERBY - MARCH 21ST & 22ND

posted by Mike on 01/03/2020

The 14th Annual Everett Blackmouth Derby will take place March 21st and 22nd this year. Tickets will be limited to just 150 this year. It will cost you $100.00 per ticket / boat (allowing up to four anglers). Here's a little run down on the prizes.

 

!st Place - $3,000.00

2nd Place - $1,500.00

3rd Place - $500.00

4th Place - 250.00

Mystery Prize - $500.00

 

Lots of Merchandise Prizes

 

For more information and rules - everettblackmouthderby.com

TIME TO SEND IN THOSE WINTER CRAB CATCH RECORD CARDS

posted by Mike on 01/03/2020

It's that time of the year again to make sure that you turn in your Winter Crab Catch Record Card. You have until the end of the month to do such. You can do it one of two ways.

 

First: Simply put it in the mail. Put it into an envelope and send it to the address below.

 

WDFW CRC Unit

PO Box 43142

Olympia, WA 98504-3142

 

Secondly: You can report your information on the internet at the following address.

 

(https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov)

 

Get them in on time, you don't want to donate $10.00 to WDFW when you purchase your 2020 crab endosement.

NO CHANGE TO PATHETIC STEELHEADING

posted by Mike on 01/03/2020

We have not seen any changes to our steelheading on our local rivers. We are still saddled with hatchery fish closures on the Snohomish, Stillaguamish and Nooksack systems. Returns of steelhead to the systems hatcheries have not improved to any extent. Here's what they have at the respective hatcheries.

 

Kendall Creek (Nooksack) 5 as of 12/30/2019

White Horse (NF Stillaguamish) 12 as of 1/01/2020

Tokul Creek (Snoqualmie) 18 as of 12/31/2019

Wallace River 3 as of 12/27/2019

Reither Pond (Skykomish) 4 as of 12/31/2019

 

Things are looking quite bleak to say the least. If the hatchery returns are this poor I really wouldn't expect our wild fish to return in any better percentages. I think we are in big trouble!

 

Most of the other reports that we are getting from other areas of the state haven't been exceptional by any means, though some are putting out at least a few fish. But not at the levels that we normally would be expecting.

 

Hopefully, we get at least enough fish back to our hatcheries to be able to at least maintain our hatchery needs this month.

WINTER BLACKMOUTH OPENS JANUARY 1ST IN MARINE AREA 10 & 11

posted by Mike on 12/27/2019

Not having any opportunity to fish blackmouth this fall or early winter except in Marine area 12 & 13, which for most of us was just plain inconvenient to trailer to or way too long of a run. On January 1st, Wednesday both Marine Area 10 - Seattle/Bremerton and Marine Area 11 - Tacoma/Vashon Island will open up for salmon fishing. Marine Area 10 will open January 1st and run through March 31st. Limit will be 1 fish with a 22 inch minimum on Chinook (Release Wild Chinook) and no size restriction on other salmon species. Marine Area 11 will open January 1st and run through April 30th. Limit will be 2 fish with a 22 inch minimum on Chinook (Release Wild Chinook) and no size restriction on other salmon species. Either area could close early if Chinook quota is attained.

With the closures this past fall and early winter we should see a higher percentage of legal fish having given them a longer time to grow. Hopefully, this will be the case which will lessen the number of sub legal fish that anglers will have to handle which in turn lessen the impacts and giving us a full season. At least that is what should happen, all we can do is wait and see.

You can also do your part to lessen the impacts on sub leagal fish by fishing larger lures and baits that are not as apealing to smaller fish. If you fish small baits and lures you will catch a greater number of these smaller blackmouth. Remember, these fish are the future of or sports fishery! Do your part and curtail your catch of these small fish and when you do handle them very carefully. Avoid netting them and release them at the boat while in the water with a dehooker. If you have to measure them to see if they are legal, then in most instances they are too small.

Good luck on the opener!

 

 

NOOKSACK SYSTEM ADDED TO STEELHEAD CLOSURE LIST

posted by Mike on 12/27/2019

Nooksack River closing to hatchery steelhead retention

Action: Closes the mainstem Nooksack and all forks to hatchery steelhead retention.

Species affected: Hatchery steelhead.

Location:

  • The Nooksack River from the mouth to the confluence of the North and South Forks.
  • The North Fork Nooksack from the Highway 9 Bridge to Nooksack Falls.
  • The Middle Fork Nooksack from the mouth to city of Bellingham diversion dam.
  • The South Fork Nooksack from the mouth to Skookum Creek.

Effective dates:  Jan. 1 through Jan. 31, 2020.

Reasons for action:  Hatchery steelhead returns to the Nooksack River and Kendall Hatchery are not meeting escapement goals. This closure is necessary to ensure hatchery broodstock goals are met.

Additional Information: The fishery may reopen earlier if broodstock needs are met. Other gamefish fisheries will remain open. On Feb. 1, hatchery steelhead retention on the North Fork only will reopen. Please refer to https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/ for further information on seasons and closures.

Information Contact: Mill Creek Regional Office, 425-775-1311.

LOCAL STEELHEADING IS PATHETIC

posted by Mike on 12/26/2019

Without a doubt this winters steelhead season is going to be one of the worse (if not the worse) we have seen. So poor are the returns of hatchery steelhead to the Stillagumish and Snohohomish systems that WDFW has closed those waters to retention of hatchery steelhead. So far, even with the closures we are not seeing any major numbers of hatchery steelhead back to the hatcheries. Here's a little run down on what WDFW has back at local hatcheries.

 

Whitehorse (NF Stilly) 11 as of 12/23/19

Tokul (Tokul Creek) 14 as of 12/24/19

Wallace (Wallace River) 3 as of 12/23/19

Reiter (Skykomish River) 2 as of 12/16/19

 

As you can see, returns have been extremely poor and at this point in our season I don't see much hope in the season turning around. If our hatchery returns are this bleak, what does it mean to the returns of our wild fish? When looking around at other portions of the state, the returns are overall way below of expectations.

EVERETT FLATS PORTION OF 8-2 TO CLOSE TO CRABBING IN JANUARY

posted by Mike on 12/26/2019

Everett Flats portion of Marine Area 8-2 to close during January recreational crab fishery extension

OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) announced today that the Everett Flats portion of Marine Area 8-2 will close to recreational crab harvest Jan. 1, 2020, and remain closed through the end of the month.

Historically, a large proportion of the crab inhabiting the Everett Flats portion of Marine Area 8-2 have been softshell after December. Under the current management plan, co-managers agreed to close this shallow region to all crab harvest after Dec. 31 to protect softshell crab during their critical molt period.

Earlier this month, state and tribal co-managers came to an agreement that the crab abundance in Marine Areas 8-1 and 8-2 would support allowing state recreational crabbing to remain open through the end of January. Crabbers will be able to crab in Marine Area 8-2 outside of Everett Flats, including Port Susan, all areas of Marine Area 8-1 (Deception Pass, Hope Island, and Skagit Bay), a portion of Marine Area 9 between the Hood Canal Bridge and a line from Foulweather Bluff to Olele Point (Port Gamble, Port Ludlow), and in Marine Area 12 (Hood Canal) north of Ayock point seven days a week through Jan. 31.

The Everett Flats closure will include the portion of catch area east of a line from Howarth Park due north to the south end of Gedney Island and the portion east of a line from the north end of Gedney Island to Camano Head, and south of a line drawn from Camano Head to Hermosa Point on the Tulalip reservation.

A valid shellfish or combination license is required to harvest throughout the remainder of the season and Dungeness crab caught through Dec. 31, 2019 must be recorded on winter catch record cards. However, recreational crabbers participating in January’s extended crab season in Marine Areas 8-1, 8-2 or 12 do not need to record Dungeness crab on a catch record card.

Other reminders for the recreational crabber:

  • Setting or pulling traps from a vessel is only allowed from one hour before official sunrise through one hour after official sunset.
  • The daily limit in Puget Sound is five Dungeness crab, males only, in hard-shell condition with a minimum carapace width of 6 1/4 inches.
  • Crabbers may also catch six red rock crab of either sex per day with a minimum carapace width of 5 inches, and six Tanner crab of either sex with a minimum carapace of 4 1/2 inches.
  • All 2019 winter crab catch record cards are due to WDFW by Feb. 4, 2020. 

For more information on catch record cards, visit WDFW's website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/licenses/fishing/catch-record-card/dungeness.

For more information on crabbing regulations, visit WDFW’s website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfishing-regulations/crab.

MERRY CHRISTMAS

posted by Mike on 12/23/2019

The crew here at Ted's Sports Center wishes all of you a very Merry Christmas. We hope that you have a great day with your family and friends.

 

We will be closing at 3:00PM on Christmas Eve and closed on Christmas Day.

 

We'll be back on Thursday!

 

Merry Christmas!

Mike - John - Larry - Josh
 

STEELHEAD LIMIT REDUCED TO 1 IN WALLA WALLA,TOUCHET, TUCANNON & GRANDE RONDE RIVERS

posted by Mike on 12/20/2019

Daily limit for steelhead in Walla Walla, Touchet, Tucannon and Grande Ronde rivers reduced to 1 hatchery fish

Action: Steelhead daily limit is 1 hatchery steelhead. Anglers must stop fishing for steelhead once their steelhead daily limit has been retained.

Effective date: Jan. 1, 2020 through April 15, 2020.

Species affected: Steelhead.

Locations:  

  1. Walla Walla River from the mouth to the Washington/Oregon state line.
  2. Touchet River from the mouth to the confluence of the North and South Forks.
  3. Tucannon River from the mouth to the Tucannon Hatchery Road Bridge.
  4. Grande Ronde River from mouth to the Washington/Oregon state line.

Reason for action: The 2019 return for upper Columbia and Snake River summer steelhead has fallen well below the predicted 118,200. Reduced limits for these streams are intended to minimize impact on wild steelhead and ensure hatchery brood escapement needs are met.

Additional information:  All steelhead with unclipped adipose fins must be immediately released unharmed. In addition, anglers must use barbless hooks when fishing for steelhead.

Anglers cannot remove any Chinook, coho or steelhead from the water if it is not to be retained as part of the daily bag limit.

Anglers are reminded to refer to the 2019-20 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet for other regulations, including possession limits, safety closures, etc. 

Information contact: Jeremy Trump, District 3 Fish Biologist, 509-382-1005

COLUMBIA RIVER RUNDOWN FOR SPRING CHINOOK FOR 2020

posted by Mike on 12/19/2019

Overall the projections mirror those of 2019. There were a few bright spots, but for the most part runs are still struggling. The likely scenario is that anglers will see fishing seasons for spring Chinook that are similar to last years.

“We go through long term cycles up and down and where we are right now is, we are heading down,” said John North, the ODFW Columbia River fisheries manager,

Much of the meeting was spent discussing the prevailing poor ocean conditions, and how it affects the salmon and steelhead populations. Ocean indicators continue to paint a picture that is less than optimal for salmon survival.

A total of 135,800 spring Chinook adults are expected to return to the mouth of the Columbia River in 2020. Of those fish, 54,100 are headed to the lower Columbia.

The 2019 projection was for 157,500 total Columbia springer adults, but the actual return was 109,808. Only 36,7070 of those springers made it back to the lower Columbia, missing the 2019 projection of 58,200.

Last year the lower Columbia from Buoy 10 to the I-5 bridge was open seven days a week in January and February but was closed on March 1 to protect poor projected hatchery returns of spring Chinook headed to the Cowlitz and Lewis Rivers. The hatcheries on those streams barely made their brood stock goals in 2019.

The Columbia from Warrior Rock at the mouth of the Lewis to Bonneville Dam opened March 1 and ran through April 10. An additional six days were added later in the season.

In 2020, once again, the trouble spots are the Lewis and Cowlitz Rivers. With only 1,400 springers expected to return to the Cowlitz, and the same number projected for the Lewis, odds are the lower Columbia will remain closed again this year.

“Basically, everything we saw in 2019 we will see again this year,” said fishing guide Bill Monroe Junior of Bill Monroe Outdoors. “We can almost guarantee we will be fishing above Warrior Rock only.”

Monroe reported that the lower river closure concentrated anglers from Warrior Rock up to Davis Bar, and the crowding was intense.

“It was a nightmare,” he said.

The projection for the Kalama River is for 1,000 adults, which may constrain any fishery on the tributary.

Oregon’s Willamette River 2020 projection of 40,800 adults is a little higher than last year’s projection of 40,200, but the run under performed and came in at only about 28,000 in 2019. The river was kept open seven days a week with a two Chinook limit under permanent regulations.

The same season structure is expected for 2020.

Last year 99,300 springers were expected to cross the Bonneville Dam, but the actual return was 73,000. The projection for this year is 81,700.

The Wind River should see about 2,000 spring Chinook in 2020, compared with an actual return of 1,500 in 2019.

The 2019 Drano Lake run came in at 3,571 adults, well below the 5,600 that were forecast. 4,600 are expected this year.

Only 404 spring Chinook returned to the Klickitat River last year. The expectation for 2020 is 1,800 adults.

Oregon’s Sandy River will probably see a return of 5200, which is better than the actual 2019 return of 3,200. The Hood River could see a return of 2,300 springers.

Summer Chinook numbers will probably not be strong enough to allow a fishery in the lower Columbia River again this year, with 38,300 forecast to the Columbia. That would still be an improvement on the 34,000 return in 2019.

Sockeye numbers are one bright spot. The expected run of over 246,000 is well above the recent returns. However, low projected returns to the Snake River may constrain managers ability to open a lower Columbia retention fishery for sockeye.

Fall salmon run projections will be finalized early next year.

Discussions of fall fisheries at the meeting centered around the underperforming coho run of 2019. Staff from both states expressed concern about the fact that the big jack return of 2018, which should have been a sign of a very strong return in 2019, but that did not pan out.

The fact that there were so many jacks that did not survive to spawn means something happened to adult coho in the ocean. Managers can only speculate about the reason.

However, the fact that the forecast missed as badly as it did may be indicative of problems with the scientific models used to predict the runs as the climate continues to change and warm.

“Certainly, the ocean has turned a little bit (poor) again in 2019.” Said Tucker Jones, the ODFW manager of ocean salmon and Columbia River. “Climate change is going to make everything more variable and dynamic, so for sure it’s a real po

So, what does an angler do in tough times such as these?

Buzz Ramsey of Yakima Bait talked about his strategy in bad years.

“When the run is down its best to plan your trips around the peak times,” said Ramsey, “because what happens is, if you have a big run, the run starts earlier and lasts longer. With a lesser run the peak is usually about the same, but it doesn’t extend out as long.”

“Anglers that want to catch big, bright salmon need to be out there during the peak times,” he added.

 

ADDITIONAL CRABBING SEASON FOR MARINE AREA 9 AND 12

posted by Mike on 12/18/2019

Winter recreational crabbing in portions of Marine Area 9 and Marine Area 12 will open through the end of January

OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) announced today that two additional marine areas of Puget Sound will re-open for recreational crab fishing and remain open through Jan. 31, 2020.

The portion of Marine Area 9 between the Hood Canal Bridge and a line from Foulweather Bluff to Olele Point (Port Gamble, Port Ludlow) and the portion of Marine Area 12 (Hood Canal) north of a line projected due east from Ayock Point will open on Dec. 20 and remain open through Jan. 31, 2020.

After evaluation of crab harvest and December test fishery data, state and tribal co-managers agree that the crab abundance in these areas can support additional harvest, allowing the state recreational fishery to remain open through the end of January.

"This higher abundance is great news for holiday crabbers and Hood Canal residents looking to get on the water," said Katelyn Bosley, a shellfish biologist with the department. "The department works hard to provide harvest opportunities at levels that ensure the crab population remains viable over time. Many more crab were found later in the season than the initial surveys indicated allowing us to provide more fishing opportunities this winter than we initially thought."

In each of these two areas, crabbing will be allowed seven days a week through Jan. 31. Sport crabbers are reminded that setting or pulling traps from a vessel is only allowed from one hour before official sunrise through one hour after official sunset. Any Dungeness crab caught in the fishery from Sept. 3 through Dec. 31, 2019 must still be recorded immediately on winter catch record cards, which are valid through Dec. 31.

Anglers 15 years and older must have a current Washington shellfish or combination license valid through March 31, 2020, to participate. Licenses can be purchased by telephone at 1-866-246-9453, at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov, or at hundreds of license vendors across the state.

After the conclusion of the regular winter harvest season on Dec. 31, 2019, winter catch reports are due to WDFW by Feb. 4, 2020. For more information on catch record cards, visit WDFW's website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/licenses/fishing/catch-record-card/dungeness .

Between Jan. 1, 2020 and Jan. 31, 2020 recreational crabbers will not be required to possess a Puget Sound Dungeness crab endorsement or record Dungeness crab retained on a Catch Record Card when crabbing in the portions of Puget Sound that are open after December 31st. (The portions of Puget Sound open between Jan. 1, 2020 and Jan. 31, 2020 are the sections of Marine Areas 9 and 12 described above as well as Marine Areas 8-1 and 8-2).

The daily limit in Puget Sound is five Dungeness crab, males only, in hard-shell condition with a minimum carapace width of 6 1/4 inches. Crabbers may also catch six red rock crab of either sex per day with a minimum carapace width of 5 inches, and six Tanner crab of either sex with a minimum carapace of 4 1/2 inches. Additional information is available on WDFW's website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfishing-regulations/crab .

In addition to the opening of the portions of Marine Areas 9 and 12 described above, crabbing opportunities are now available in the following areas: 

  • Marine Area 4 east of the Bonilla-Tatoosh line (through Dec. 31)
  • Marine Area 5 (Sekiu) (through Dec. 31)
  • Marine Area 6 (East Juan de Fuca Strait) (through Dec. 31)
  • Marine Area 7 (San Juans, Bellingham, Gulf of Georgia) (through Dec. 31)
  • The remaining portion of Marine Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet) (through Dec. 31)
  • Marine Area 8-1 (Deception Pass, Hope Island, and Skagit Bay) (through Jan. 31 2020)
  • Marine Area 8-2 (Port Susan and Port Gardner) (through Jan. 31 2020)

For maps of these areas, please see WDFW's fishing regulations, starting on page 98, and available here.

SNOHOMISH SYSTEM CLOSES TO RETENTION OF HATCHERY STEELHEAD

posted by Mike on 12/17/2019

Snohomish, Skykomish, Snoqualmie, Wallace rivers and Tokul Creek to close to retention of hatchery steelhead

Action: Closes the Snohomish, Skykomish, Snoqualmie Rivers, Wallace rivers and Tokul Creek to retention of hatchery steelhead.

Effective date: Dec. 19, 2019 until further notice.

Species affected: Hatchery steelhead.

Location:  

  • Snohomish River, from the mouth upstream to confluence of the Skykomish and Snoqualmie rivers;
  • Skykomish River, from the mouth upstream to the confluence of the North Fork Skykomish and South Fork Skykomish rivers;
  • Wallace River;
  • Snoqualmie River, from the mouth upstream to Snoqualmie Falls;
  • Tokul Creek.

Reason for action: The Wallace River, Reiter Ponds, and Tokul Creek hatcheries do not have adequate early winter steelhead broodstock on hand to meet egg-take goals.

Additional information: Fishing will reopen if egg-take goals are met. Retention of wild steelhead is unlawful statewide.

Information contact: Team Mill Creek, 425-775-1311.

MAIN & N.F. STILLAGUAMISH RIVERS CLOSING TO RETENTION OF HATCHERY STEELHEAD

posted by Mike on 12/17/2019

Stillaguamish and North Fork Stillaguamish rivers closing to retention of hatchery steelhead

Action: Closes the mainstem Stillaguamish and the North Fork Stillaguamish rivers to retention of hatchery steelhead.

Effective date: Dec. 19, 2019 until further notice.

Species affected: Hatchery steelhead

Location:  

  • Stillaguamish River, from the mouth upstream to confluence of the North Fork Stillaguamish and South Fork Stillaguamish rivers.
  • North Fork Stillaguamish River, from the mouth upstream to Swede Heaven Bridge.

Reason for action: The Whitehorse Ponds hatchery does not have adequate early winter steelhead broodstock on hand to meet egg-take goals.

Additional information: Fishing will reopen if egg-take goals are met. Retention of wild steelhead is unlawful statewide.

Information contact: Team Mill Creek, 425-775-1311.

HOKO RIVER CLOSING TO ALL STEELHEAD RETENTION

posted by Mike on 12/12/2019

Anglers must release all steelhead in the Hoko River

Action: Requires the release of all steelhead in the Hoko River.

Effective date: Dec. 12, 2019, until further notice.

Species affected: Hatchery steelhead.

Locations: Hoko River (Clallam County), from the mouth to the Ellis Creek Bridge (river mile 18.5).

Reason for action: Preseason expectations of hatchery-origin steelhead are low, requiring the release of hatchery steelhead to meet hatchery broodstock goals.

Additional information: If broodstock goals are met, the river may reopen to hatchery steelhead retention. Anglers should refer to the 2019-20 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet for other ongoing fishing opportunities. The pamphlet is available online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/.

Information contact: Region 6 Montesano office, 360-249-4628.

Report Archive