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Reports

RESULTS FROM STANWOOD EAGLES DERBY LAST WEEKEND

posted by Mike on 04/26/2017

WOW!!!!! Can you believe it Fishermen and Fisher ladies,
 
We made it!!! Got though this year's winter blackmouth  season with out getting the axe from the state.
 
And ended it with one of the Best Stanwood Eagles Derby EVER. 30 years and still going strong.
 
We had 133 entries and 35 fish enter in the derby. Our sponsors and donators came though with Bigger and Better donations then ever. 
 
Give them a BIG hand, along with the Stanwood Eagles. They do a great job putting on this derby. 
 
Lets get down to the facts. Someone has got the Hot boat.
 
1st place    Cory Myron             15.4 lbs     $2900
 
2nd place    Larry Mandella       14.9 lbs
 
3rd place     Mike Navarre         13.8 lbs
 
4th place     Kevin Hushagen    12.7 lbs
 
5thplace       Gary Brossard      12.3 lbs
 
 
Me and the Stanwood Eagles can't thank everyone enough for being evolved or participating in this derby. And the donators and people who donated their time for this derby.
 
Everybody has made this a great event.
 
Thank You,  FISH ON!
 
 
 

RAZOR CLAM DIGS OK'D FOR WASHINGTON COASTAL BEACHES

posted by Mike on 04/26/2017

Razor clam dig OK'd with bonus at Long Beach

OLYMPIA – Razor clam diggers can look forward to a six-day opening starting tomorrow (April 26) on various ocean beaches and will have an increased daily limit of 25 clams at Long Beach.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has approved the dig on morning tides at four ocean beaches after toxin test results show the clams on those beaches are safe to eat.

State shellfish managers agreed to increase the daily limit for this dig at Long Beach, which has been closed much of the razor clam season due to elevated marine toxin levels, said Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager. 

"We wanted to provide diggers with some additional opportunity at Long Beach since we know there are plenty of clams there for harvest," Ayres said.

The increased limit of 25 clams per day applies only at Long Beach, Ayres said. Diggers at Twin Harbors, Mocrocks and Copalis can harvest the typical limit of 15 clams per day. Diggers are required to keep the first 15 clams (or first 25 clams at Long Beach) they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container.

Ayres noted the opening coincides with the annual Long Beach Razor Clam Festival, which is held April 29 and 30. For more information, visit the festival website at http://longbeachrazorclamfestival.com/.

The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates and morning low tides:

  • April 26, Wednesday, 7:09 a.m.; -1.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 27, Thursday, 7:55 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Long Beach
  • April 28, Friday, 8:42 a.m.; -1.8 feet, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Long Beach
  • April 29, Saturday, 9:32 a.m.; -1.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Long Beach
  • April 30, Sunday, 10:24 a.m.; -1.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, Long Beach
  • May 1, Monday, 11:20 a.m.; -0.8 feet; Long Beach

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2017-18 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

State health officials recently requested additional toxin tests at all four beaches after increased amounts of the algae that can cause domoic acid were observed in ocean waters. A natural toxin, domoic acid can be harmful or even fatal if consumed in sufficient quantities.

"The latest round of test results indicate we're in the clear for digging at all four beaches," Ayres said.

A decision about possible additional dates in May will be announced following another round of toxin tests next week.

State wildlife managers urge clam diggers to avoid disturbing snowy plovers and streaked horned larks. Both species nest in the soft, dry sand on the southern section of Twin Harbors beach and at Leadbetter Point on the Long Beach Peninsula. The snowy plover is a small bird with gray wings and a white breast. The lark is a small bird with a pale yellow breast and brown back. Male larks have a black mask, breast band and "horns."

To protect these birds, the department asks that clam diggers avoid the dunes and areas of the beach with soft, dry sand. When driving to a clam-digging area, diggers should enter the beach only at designated access points and stay on the hard-packed sand near or below the high tide line.

More details on how to avoid disturbing nesting birds can be found on the WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.

TICKETS FOR 8TH ANNUAL LAKE STEVENS KOKANEE DERBY ARE HERE

posted by Mike on 04/24/2017

We have the tickets for the 8th Annual Lake Stevens Konanee Derby on hand. Once again, tickets are $20.00 per person 15years or older and those 14 and under are "FREE". This is a very popular local event and one that everyone looks forward to.

 

I will post some additional information shortly!

LAKE STEVENS KOKANEE FISHING STARTING TO HEAT UP

posted by Mike on 04/20/2017

Lake Stevens has finally started putting out some decent numbers of kokanee over the past couple of days. We have had a couple of guys that have chocked up some decent numbers in the past few days. Both found the fish from the surface down to 15 feet. When the fish are this shallow make sure to place your offerings a considerable distance from the boat. I would say 100 feet would be the least amount of drop back I would have. You will find these shallow water early season fish extremely boat shy.

 

The fish were averaging 11 -12 inches, nothing to brag about but good eaters to say the least.

 

The one gentleman I spoke with had done well fishing a "God's Tooth" spoon in Chartreuse rigged kokanee style baited with Shoe Peg corn. To rig the spoon for kokanee simply take all the hardware off the lure, take a typical double hooked leader and drop a number 4mil bead or two down the leader and then simply thread the leader through the hole at the pointed end of the spoon (from the upperside) then through the upper hole of the spoon from the underside to the top side and start with about a 14 inch leader behind your favorite attractor. Bait the hooks with your corn and your ready to start fishing.

 

This is just the start of kokanee season at Lake Stevens and we should see good fishing until Fall.
 

WDFW CLOSES RAZOR CLAM DIGS APRIL 24TH & 25TH

posted by Mike on 04/19/2017

WDFW cancels first 2 days of upcoming razor clam dig;
April 26 opening depends on toxin tests

OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers have canceled the first two days (April 24 and 25) of a tentatively planned eight-day razor clam dig due to rising marine toxin levels.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will announce next week whether the rest of the dig, now scheduled to begin April 26, will go forward as planned.

Recent tests have found toxin levels at all ocean beaches meet health standards, but the Washington Department of Health has asked for one more test to be sure, said Dan Ayres, coastal shellfish manager for WDFW.

"In the last few days, we've seen increasing levels of the algae that can cause domoic acid in ocean water," Ayres said. "We just want to make sure razor clams are safe to eat before giving the green light on this dig."

Domoic acid, a natural toxin produced by certain types of marine algae, can be harmful or even fatal if consumed in sufficient quantities. The toxin has disrupted razor clam digs along Washington's coast over the past two years.

More information about domoic acid can be found on WDFW's webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/domoic_acid.html.

The department will announce the results of the upcoming toxin test early next week on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html.

The proposed dig, along with morning low tides and beaches, is listed below:

  • April 26, Wednesday, 7:09 a.m.; -1.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 27, Thursday, 7:55 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Long Beach
  • April 28, Friday, 8:42 a.m.; -1.8 feet, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Long Beach
  • April 29, Saturday, 9:32 a.m.; -1.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Long Beach
  • April 30, Sunday, 10:24 a.m.; -1.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, Long Beach
  • May 1, Monday, 11:20 a.m.; -0.8 feet; Long Beach

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2017-18 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Tags: Razor Clams

21ST APRIL LAST DAY TO FISH SALMON IN MARINE AREA 7, SAN JUAN ISLANDS

posted by Mike on 04/18/2017

Marine Area 7 recreational salmon season to close

Action: Marine Area 7 (San Juan Islands) will close to salmon fishing at the end of the day April 21.

Effective Date:  12: 01 a.m. April 22 through April 30, 2017.

Species affected: Salmon.

Location:  Marine Area 7.

Reason for action: Preliminary estimates and fishery projections indicate that Marine Area 7 will exceed the allowable limit of total chinook encounters – including both retained and released fish – prior to the planned April 30 closure date.  The fishery is being closed to control impacts on stocks of concern and ensure compliance with conservation objectives. 

Other information:  Through April 21, Marine Area 7 has a one hatchery chinook limit. Salmon fishing remains open in other areas, including marine areas 5, 8-1, 8-2, 11, 12 and 13.  Check the sport fishing rules page for details: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/.  The most recent preliminary estimates can be found at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/reports_plants.html.

Information contact: Ryan Lothrop, (360) 902-2808, or Mark Baltzell, (360) 902-2807.

FINALIZED HALIBUT SEASONS FOR WASHINGTON STATE

posted by Mike on 04/14/2017

Halibut fishing to open May 4 under higher catch quotas

OLYMPIA – Anglers fishing for halibut will notice a change this year with consistent halibut seasons across all Puget Sound and ocean areas, except marine waters near the mouth the Columbia River.

The scheduled season dates are May 4, 6, 11, 21 and 25, and June 1 and 4, provided there is sufficient quota to accommodate all these fishing days. These dates apply to halibut fishing in Puget Sound marine areas 5-10 and in ocean marine areas 2-4.

Halibut fishing in Marine Area 1 also gets under way May 4, but will be open four days per week (Thursday through Sunday) until the quota has been met.

State halibut seasons are established by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), using catch quotas adopted by the International Pacific Halibut Commission for coastal fisheries from California to Alaska.

Heather Reed, WDFW coastal policy coordinator, noted that this year's quota for recreational halibut fisheries in Washington state is 243,667 pounds – an increase of about 23,652 pounds from 2016.

"We expect that the effort to align halibut season dates, together with a higher quota for the state's recreational fisheries, will result in a longer season than what anglers have experienced in past years," Reed said.

Halibut fishing has become an increasingly popular sport in Washington, making it difficult to predict how quickly anglers will reach the harvest limit for any given area, Reed said. The new season structure will help to ensure the state does not exceed federal quotas, with periodic catch assessments in each fishing area, she said.

Anglers should check the WDFW website for the latest information on openings before heading out, she said.

In all marine areas open to halibut fishing, there is a one-fish daily catch limit and two-fish possession limit in the field, and no minimum size restriction. Anglers must record their catch on a WDFW catch record card.

As in past years, Puget Sound marine areas 11, 12 and 13 will remain closed to halibut fishing.

In Marine areas 5 and 6, lingcod and Pacific cod can be retained in waters deeper than 120 feet on days when the recreational halibut fishery is open.

Additional changes in halibut-fishing rules that take effect for specific waters this year include:

  • Marine Area 1: Anglers will be allowed to keep a lingcod when halibut are on board during the all-depth fishery, but only when fishing north of the Washington-Oregon border during the month of May. The nearshore area in Marine Area 1 will open three days per week (Monday through Wednesday) beginning May 8 until the nearshore quota is taken. Bottomfish can be retained when halibut are onboard in the nearshore area. 
  • Marine Area 2 (Westport): Beginning the Saturday after the all-depth fishery closes, the nearshore fishery will open seven days per week until the quota is taken.
  • Marine areas 3 (La Push) and 4 (Neah Bay) west of the Bonilla-Tatoosh line: Bottomfish fishing will be restricted to the area shoreward of 20 fathoms (120 feet) beginning May 1 through Labor Day. Lingcod, sablefish, and Pacific cod can be retained seaward of 20 fathoms (120 feet) on days open to recreational halibut fishing.  

Anglers should check the WDFW website for complete information on recreational halibut regulations and seasons at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/creel/halibut/

MORE RAZOR CLAM DIGGING ON WASHINGTON COAST

posted by Mike on 04/13/2017

Razor clam dig starts Wednesday
at 4 beaches, including Long Beach

OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers have approved a five-day razor clam dig set to begin Wednesday (April 12) on morning tides at four ocean beaches, including Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the opening after marine toxin tests showed that clams at all four beaches are safe to eat.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, noted that the upcoming dig marks the first time Long Beach will open for clam digging this season. Marine toxin levels at the beach had exceeded state health standards since last fall, but not anymore, Ayres said. 

"We know that people have been waiting to dig razor clams at Long Beach for a long time, and we're pleased we can finally add that beach to the line-up," Ayres said. "Toxin levels there and at the other three beaches are all well within state health standards."

Long Beach and Twin Harbors will both be open for five straight days of digging, while Copalis and Mocrocks will open on alternating days. All four beaches will be open on morning tides, with no digging allowed after noon.

The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates and morning low tides:

  • April 12, Wednesday, 8:08 a.m., 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 13, Thursday, 8:43 a.m., 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, Long Beach
  • April 14, Friday, 9:18 a.m., 0.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Long Beach
  • April 15, Saturday, 9:55 a.m., 0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, Long Beach
  • April 16, Sunday, 10:36 a.m., 0.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Long Beach

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2017-18 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Ayres noted that Long Beach has also been added to a dig tentatively scheduled later this month along with the other three beaches. Final approval of that dig will depend on the results of future marine toxin tests, which generally take place about a week before the dig is scheduled.

Pending favorable test results, the proposed dig will be held on the following beaches, dates and morning low tides:

  • April 24, Monday, 5:38 a.m., 0.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 25, Tuesday, 6:24 a.m., -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 26, Wednesday, 7:09 a.m., -1.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach
  • April 27, Thursday, 7:55 a.m., -1.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Long Beach
  • April 28, Friday, 8:42 a.m., -1.8 feet, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Long Beach
  • April 29, Saturday, 9:32 a.m., -1.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks, Long Beach
  • April 30, Sunday, 10:24 a.m., -1.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, Long Beach
  • May 1, Monday, 11:20 a.m., -0.8 feet; Long Beach

During all upcoming digs, state wildlife managers urge clam diggers to avoid disturbing snowy plovers and streaked horned larks. Both species nest in the soft, dry sand on the southern section of Twin Harbors beach and at Leadbetter Point on the Long Beach Peninsula. The snowy plover is a small bird with gray wings and a white breast. The lark is a small bird with a pale yellow breast and brown back. Male larks have a black mask, breast band and "horns."

To protect these birds, the department asks that clam diggers avoid the dunes and areas of the beach with soft, dry sand. When driving to a clam-digging area, diggers should enter the beach only at designated access points and stay on the hard-packed sand near or below the high tide line.

More details on how to avoid disturbing nesting birds can be found on the WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/


 

SPRING CHINOOK FISHERY EXTENDED IN LOWER COLUMBIA RIVER

posted by Mike on 04/12/2017

Spring chinook fishery extended again in lower Columbia River

OLYMPIA – State fishery managers have again extended the initial sportfishing season for spring chinook salmon on the lower Columbia River in response to poor fishing conditions caused by extremely high, turbid water.

The fishery will reopen from April 13-17 and from April 20-23 upstream from Buoy 10 at the mouth of the Columbia River to Bonneville Dam, except in the Lewis River sanctuary.

The extension was approved today by fishery managers from Washington and Oregon, who previously extended the season by four days earlier this month.

With seasonal water flow well above average, anglers have not had much success in getting fish to bite, said Ron Roler, a Columbia River fishery manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

Through April 10, anglers had caught only about 10 percent of the upriver spring chinook available for harvest at this point in the season.

Meanwhile, only 217 adult spring chinook salmon have been counted passing Bonneville Dam through April 10, far short of the 1,600 fish previously expected by mid-April.

"Test fisheries in the lower river are finding plenty of spring chinook," Roler said. "They're just not very quick to bite or move upriver under these conditions. Often visibility in the river is so limited that the fish can't see the anglers' lures."

He suggests that anglers check reports of streamflows and fish-passage levels at Bonneville Dam for signs of improving fishing conditions.

"Fishing should pick up fairly quickly once the fish start to move," Roler said.

Anglers planning to fish for spring chinook in the lower Columbia are advised to check the new fishing rule at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/.

The spring chinook fishery upriver from Bonneville Dam to the Washington-Oregon border near Umatilla is not affected by the extension in the lower river and remains open until May 5. If spring chinook return at or above projections, fishery managers plan to provide additional fishing opportunities in both areas later this spring.

Anglers fishing those waters are allowed to retain one marked, hatchery-reared adult chinook salmon as part of their daily limit of two salmon, two steelhead, or one of each. Any chinook or steelhead without a clipped adipose fin and a healed scar must be released unharmed.

WASHINGTON SALMON FISHERIES SET FOR 2017

posted by Mike on 04/11/2017

Washington's salmon fisheries set for 2017

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Washington anglers can expect a mixed bag of salmon fisheries this year with slightly increased opportunities in the ocean, seasons similar to last year in the Columbia River, and continued restrictions in Puget Sound. 

The state's 2017 salmon fishing seasons, developed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and treaty tribal co-managers, were finalized during the Pacific Fishery Management Council's meeting in Sacramento, Calif.

In recent years, unfavorable environmental conditions, such as warm ocean water and drought, have reduced the number of salmon returning to Washington's waters, said Kyle Adicks, salmon policy lead for WDFW.

"We're in the third year of a multi-year downturn in salmon returns," Adicks said. "Similar to last year, we faced significant challenges in crafting fisheries."

With low returns of coho and wild chinook expected back to several rivers, fishery managers are limiting opportunities in some areas to protect those fish. The most severe restrictions will be in Puget Sound marine and freshwater areas, where the forecast is for extremely low returns of "key stocks," such as Skagit River coho and Nooksack River chinook.

"We made some difficult decisions this year in order to protect weak salmon stocks," said Adicks. "However, we worked with constituents to preserve fishing opportunities where it made sense."

Anglers fishing for coho in Puget Sound marine areas will have improved opportunities in areas 9-13 while those fishing in areas 5-8 will see closures or will be limited to openings that align with chinook seasons. That's still an improvement from last year, when only Hood Canal and south Sound were open for coho fishing. Rivers such as the Skagit and Stillaguamish also will be closed to coho fishing this year.

Opportunities for chinook fishing in Puget Sound marine areas are somewhat similar to last year with a few more closures in the winter. Marine areas 9 (Admiralty Inlet) and 10 (Seattle/Bremerton) are scheduled to be open from July 16 through Aug. 15, like in 2016. However, both areas have higher catch quotas that should provide better opportunity.

Anglers will have limited opportunities to fish for pink salmon in Puget Sound due to projected low returns of pinks this year. There are no "bonus bag" limits for pink salmon in 2017.

In the Columbia River, anglers will see salmon fisheries that are similar to last year. The popular Buoy 10 fishery opens Aug. 1 while the chinook fishery on the mainstem from the Astoria-Megler Bridge upstream to the Hwy. 395 Bridge will be open from June 16 through July 31 for hatchery summer chinook and sockeye.

Anglers fishing Washington's ocean waters will be able to retain chinook, as well as coho salmon in all four marine areas, as compared to 2016 when coho retention was limited only to Marine Area 1. Salmon fisheries get underway daily in areas 1 (Ilwaco), 3 (La Push) and 4 (Neah Bay) on June 24 and on July 1 in Marine Area 2 (Westport).

Information on recreational salmon fisheries in Washington's ocean waters and the lower Columbia River is available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/, where notable changes to this year's Puget Sound sport salmon fisheries also can be found. Details on all recreational salmon fisheries will be provided in the 2017-18 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, which will be available in late June.

For information on tribal fisheries, contact the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission (http://nwifc.org/).

STANWOOD EAGLES 30TH ANNUAL BLACKMOUTH FISHING DERBY APRIL 22ND & 23RD

posted by Mike on 04/05/2017

The Stanwood Eagles will be holding their 30th Annual Blackmouth Derby Saturdau April 22nd & Sunday April 23rd. The entry fee with be $50.00 per person and everyone in the boat must have a ticket.

 

Money prizes will be based upon the number of entries.

1st Place 45% of Total Entry Fees

2nd Place 20% of Total Entry Fees

3rd Place 15% of Total Entry Fees

4th Place 10% of Total Entyr Fees

5th Place 5% of Total Entry Fees

Plus Lots Of Donated Prizes

 

Tickets can be purchased at the following locations:

Stanwood Eagles

Ted's Sports Center

Holiday Sports

John's Sporting Goods

Camano Marine

Elger Bay Store

 

For more information call: Stanwood Eagles (360) 629-3224 or Ed Keller (425) 308-9437

MONROE SPORTSMAN'S SHOW - APRIL 7TH - 9TH

posted by Mike on 04/05/2017

 

The Monroe Sportsman Show

Fun for the whole family at the Evergreen State Fairgrounds.

Friday     April 7th   Noon to 8pm
Saturday April 8th   10am to 8pm
Sunday   April 9th   10am to 4pm

Coordinated by the Sno-King Chapter of the Puget Sound Anglers and sponsored by 3 Rivers Marine. Made possible in part with support of the TPA fund of Snohomish County.

For the kids
A stocked pond onsite they can learn to cast and catch a real trout!

For the adults
A number of guest speakers as well as a myriad of vendors displaying their wares at significant discounts!

TWIN HARBOR RAZOR CLAM DIG STARTING APRIL 5TH

posted by Mike on 04/05/2017

WDFW approves razor clam dig at Twin Harbors starting April 5

OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers have given the OK for a five-day razor clam dig at Twin Harbors starting April 5, and have tentatively scheduled the beach to open again later this month. 

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the opening after marine toxin tests showed clams at Twin Harbors are safe to eat.

Razor clam diggers should be aware that the first four days of the dig are on evening tides, whereas the last day's dig is on a morning tide, said Dan Ayres, coastal shellfish manager for WDFW.

"We know diggers are looking forward to returning to Twin Harbors and we are happy to announce these new opportunities," Ayres said.

The first four days of digging are approved on the following dates and evening low tides:

  • April 5, Wednesday, 3:06 p.m.; 0.5 feet; Twin Harbors
  • April 6, Thursday, 4:08 p.m.; 0.4 feet; Twin Harbors
  • April 7, Friday, 5:01 p.m.; 0.4 feet; Twin Harbors
  • April 8, Saturday, 5:46 p.m.; 0.4 feet; Twin Harbors

The fifth day of digging will be conducted on morning tides, as will other digs through the end of the season:

  • April 9, Sunday, 6:25 a.m.; 0.5 feet; Twin Harbors

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2017-18 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

State shellfish managers also added Twin Harbors to a tentatively scheduled dig in mid-April that includes openings at Copalis and Mocrocks. The planned opening depends on the results of marine toxin tests, which generally take place about a week before the dig is scheduled.

The proposed razor clam digs, along with morning low tides and beaches, are listed below:

  • April 12, Wednesday, 8:08 a.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors
  • April 13, Thursday, 8:43 a.m.; 0.0 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • April 14, Friday, 9:18 a.m.; 0.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • April 15, Saturday, 9:55 a.m.; 0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • April 16, Sunday, 10:36 a.m., 0.5 feet; Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

Long Beach remains closed to digging, Ayres noted. However, the beach could open soon if the next round of toxin testing shows the clams there are safe to eat.

During all upcoming digs, state wildlife managers urge clam diggers to avoid disturbing snowy plovers and streaked horned larks. Both species nest in the soft, dry sand on the southern section of Twin Harbors beach and at Leadbetter Point on the Long Beach Peninsula. The snowy plover is a small bird with gray wings and a white breast. The lark is a small bird with a pale yellow breast and brown back. Male larks have a black mask, breast band and "horns."

To protect these birds, the department asks that clam diggers avoid the dunes and areas of the beach with soft, dry sand. When driving to a clam-digging area, diggers should enter the beach only at designated access points and stay on the hard-packed sand near or below the high tide line.

More details on how to avoid disturbing nesting birds can be found on the WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/

SPRING CHINOOK SEASON EXTENDED THROUGH APRIL 10 ON COLUMBIA RIVER

posted by Mike on 03/30/2017

Today the States of Washington and Oregon DFW staff held a Joint State hearing to consider an extension of the spring chinook fishery in the lower Columbia River which was scheduled to close on April 6.  They extended the fishery through April 10, giving early notice and time for friends and families time to plan a few extra days of fishing.  Enjoy!
 
According to the staff report, the estimated Chinook catch through Sunday March 26 is 53 kept adult fish and 6 released (~25 upriver mortalities) from 8,305 angler trips compared to an expectation of 1,575 kept (1,150 upriver mortalities) from 33,900 angler trips based on preseason modeling.  The extreme high water conditions, combined with turbidity and lower than normal river temperatures are expected to continue into next week and potentially beyond.   
 
In addition to extending the fishery, both agencies committed to using real time data and nimble reaction times to provide further reopeners.  Tucker Jones noted that fisheries in April can be very dynamic and further openings were likely to be in "chunks". (which is a very technical term for days/week).  They hope to open fisheries, review catch rates and run updates to determine opportunities for further fisheries. 
 

COWLITZ RIVER STEELHEADING HAS BEEN GOOD

posted by Mike on 03/28/2017

Though the steelheading on the Cowlitz River started a bit on the late side this season, the fishing that we have been seeing lately has been quite good. The river has been a tough show for both the bank and boat anglers as the river has been extremely high. With high conditions the river does not lend itsself to the best bank fishing as it limits anglers to a minimum of bank where they can fish and when they do hook a fish the flow is so heavy that most of the fish are lost when one cannot follow their fish. For the boater the flow has also been something to contend with, requiring good boat handling.

 

The size of the fish has been quite good with the smaller fish 7 -9 pounds and many in the mid teens to low twenties.

 

This fishery should continue for at least  a few more weeks before we start to see a slowdown and perhaps it will last later as the fishery started quite late.

MORNING RAZOR CLAM DIGS ON COPALIS & MOCROCKS BEACHES

posted by Mike on 03/28/2017

Razor clam dig alternates between two beaches beginning March 30

OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers have approved a morning razor clam dig starting March 30 with openings alternating between Mocrocks and Copalis beaches through April 2.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the four-day dig – the first dig of the season on morning tides – after marine toxin tests showed that clams on those two beaches are safe to eat.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said diggers should be aware that only one beach – either Mocrocks or Copalis – will be open each day of the upcoming dig.

Ayres also reminds diggers that all state fishing licenses expire March 31, so they will need to purchase a 2017-18 fishing license if they plan to participate in the digs approved for Saturday, April 1, and Sunday, April 2.

Licenses applicable to digging razor clams include an annual razor clam license, a shellfish license or a combination fishing license. A three-day razor clam license is also available, although it is restricted to digging days in a single licensing year.

All licenses are available online at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/ and from sporting goods stores and other licensing outlets throughout the state.

The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates and morning low tides:

  • March 30, Thursday, 8:58 a.m.; -0.6 feet, Mocrocks
  • March 31, Friday, 9:47 a.m.; -0.6 feet, Copalis
  • April 1, Saturday, 10:40 a.m.; -0.5 feet, Mocrocks
  • April 2, Sunday; 11:39 a.m., -0.1 feet, Copalis

Long Beach and Twin Harbors remain closed to digging, because they have not yet met state testing requirements for marine toxins, Ayres said.

Copalis Beach extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Mocrocks Beach extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Maps of those beaches and information about razor clam digs proposed in the future are available on WDFW's website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/current.html

 

JOHN DAY POOL TO CLOSE FOR STURGEON RETENTION

posted by Mike on 03/28/2017

John Day Pool on Columbia River to close for retention of sturgeon

Action: Closes retention of sturgeon in John Day Pool.

Effective date: March 30, 2017, until further notice.

Species affected: White sturgeon.

Locations: The Columbia River and tributaries from John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam.

Reason for action: The harvest guideline is expected to be reached by the effective date of this rule.

Information contact: (360) 696-6211. For latest information press *1010.

 

CHEHALIS RIVER WILL NOT OPEN FOR SPRING CHINOOK FISHING

posted by Mike on 03/24/2017

Chehalis River will not open for spring chinook fishing

Action: The Chehalis River will remain closed to salmon fishing and will not open to fishing for spring chinook on April 16 as scheduled in the 2016-17 Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet.

Effective dates:  April 16 through June 30, 2017.

Location: Chehalis River, from the mouth (Hwy 101 Bridge) to the Hwy 6 Bridge in the town of Adna (Grays Harbor/Thurston/Lewis counties).

Reason for action: The forecast for spring chinook returning to the Chehalis River basin is less than the number of fish needed to meet conservation objectives (spawning escapement goal).  

Other Information: Steelhead and other gamefish fisheries will remain as described in the 2016-17 Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet.

Information Contact:  Mike Scharpf, Region 6, (360) 249-1205

SAN JUANS (MARINE AREA 7) REOPENS FOR SALMON FISHING EFFECTIVE MARCH 25TH

posted by Mike on 03/24/2017

Marine Area 7 salmon season reopening March 25

Action: Marine Area 7 (San Juan Islands) will reopen to salmon fishing March 25. The daily limit for hatchery chinook salmon in Marine Area 7 will be one chinook, with an overall two-salmon daily limit. All coho and wild chinook salmon must be released. 

Effective Date: March 25, 2017, through April 30, 2017.

Species affected: Salmon.

Location:  Marine Area 7 within Puget Sound.

Reason for action: Test fishery data collected during March indicates there are fewer juvenile (sublegal-size) chinook salmon present in Marine Area 7 waters than in recent months. Sufficient capacity exists to re-open the fishery within the guideline of 10,248 "chinook encounters" – including both retained and released fish – agreed to by the tribal co-managers before this year's fishery began. Temporarily closing the fishery in mid-February allowed the state time to determine a reopening date that would give anglers opportunity later into the spring. 

Other information:  WDFW will continue to monitor the fishery and will consult with the advisors as more information becomes available. The most recent preliminary estimates can be found at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/reports_plants.html. Check the sport fishing rules page for details: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/

Information contact: Ryan Lothrop, (360) 902-2808.

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