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WDFW REDUCES SAMON LIMIT TO ONE FISH IN MARINE AREA 6

posted by Mike on 03/01/2019

WDFW reduces daily catch limit to 1 salmon in Marine Area 6

Action: Reduces the daily limit for salmon to one fish in Marine Area 6 (east Juan de Fuca Strait).

The 2018-19 Washington Sportfishing Rules pamphlet erroneously states that anglers can keep two salmon daily.

Effective date:  Immediately.

Species affected:  Salmon.

Location:  Marine Area 6 (east Juan de Fuca Strait).

Reason for action: This corrects an error in the 2018-19 Washington Sportfishing Rules pamphlet. These regulations were agreed to with co-managers during the annual North of Falcon salmon season-setting process.

State fishery managers set the daily salmon limit at one fish to meet conservation objectives and increase the likelihood the winter fishery would remain open for the entire season.

Additional information: Anglers are reminded to release wild coho and wild chinook.

Information contact: David Stormer, Puget Sound recreational salmon manager, 360-902-0058; Mark Baltzell, Puget Sound salmon manager, 360-902-2807.

FORECAST SALMON NUMBERS FOR WASHINGTON STATE

posted by Mike on 02/28/2019

Forecast indicates improved coho salmon numbers
as managers begin to develop this year’s fishing seasons

OLYMPIA – Fishery managers estimate higher numbers of coho salmon will return to Washington’s waters in 2019 compared to last year, but expect low returns of wild chinook will again make setting fishing seasons a challenge. 

Forecasts for chinook, coho, sockeye, chum, and pink salmon – developed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and treaty Indian tribes – were released today during a public meeting in Olympia.

The forecast meeting marks the starting point for crafting 2019 salmon-fishing seasons in Puget Sound, the Columbia River and Washington coastal areas. The annual process for setting salmon fisheries is known as "North of Falcon." Fishery managers have scheduled a series of public meetings through early April before finalizing seasons later that month.

Kelly Susewind, WDFW director, said fishery managers will look to design fishing seasons that not only meet conservation goals for salmon but also minimize impacts on the region’s struggling southern resident killer whale population.

“In the coming weeks, we’ll be working with tribal co-managers and constituents to make sure that we meet our conservation objectives while providing fishing opportunities where possible,” Susewind said. “It’s complicated, but important work.”

The forecasts are based on varying environmental indicators, such as ocean conditions, as well as surveys of spawning salmon, and the number of juvenile salmon migrating to marine waters.

As in past years, salmon-fishing prospects in 2019 vary by area:

Columbia River:  About 218,200 “upriver brights” are expected to return to areas of the Columbia River above Bonneville Dam. That’s similar to the return in 2018 but down more than 50 percent from the most recent 10-year average.

An estimated 905,800 coho are projected to return to the Columbia River this year, an increase of 619,600 fish from the 2018 forecast. About 147,000 coho actually returned to the Columbia River last year.

Salmon fisheries in the Columbia River will likely be designed to harvest abundant coho stocks while protecting depleted chinook and “B-run” steelhead, which return to the Columbia and Snake river basins.

Washington’s ocean waters: Anglers should have more coho fishing opportunities in Washington’s ocean waters this summer compared to 2018, given higher numbers of coho projected to return to the Columbia River and to Washington’s coastal streams.

This year’s forecast of about 100,500 hatchery chinook to the lower Columbia River is down 12,000 fish from last year’s projected return. Those hatchery chinook – known as “tules” – are the backbone of the recreational ocean fishery.

Puget Sound: Increased returns of coho salmon should provide anglers with some good fishing opportunities including in areas in mid and south Sound, said Kyle Adicks, salmon fisheries policy lead for WDFW.

Roughly 670,200 wild and hatchery coho are expected to return to Puget Sound this year, up 15 percent of the 10-year average. However, the total forecast for wild and hatchery chinook is down slightly from 2018.

“We’re again expecting extremely low returns in key stocks such as Stillaguamish and mid-Hood Canal chinook, which will again limit salmon fishing opportunities,” Adicks said.

Meanwhile, this year's run of pink salmon, which mostly return to Washington's waters only in odd-numbered years, is expected to be 608,400 fish. That’s roughly 10 percent of the 10-year average of 5.7 million fish.

Southern resident killer whales

While developing fishing proposals, the department will consider the dietary needs of southern resident killer whales as well as ways to protect orcas from disruptions from fishing vessel traffic, Adicks said.

The declining availability of salmon – southern resident orcas’ primary prey – and disruptions from boating traffic have been linked to a downturn in the region's orca population over the past 30 years.

WDFW is working with the National Marine Fisheries Service to develop tools to assess the effects of fisheries on available prey for orcas.

Public meetings and comment opportunities

A meeting schedule, salmon forecasts, and information about the salmon season-setting process are available on WDFW's website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/.

WDFW intends to livestream several public meetings, including those scheduled on March 19 and April 3. The department will provide links to those upcoming livestreams,  as well as to the archived video from Wednesday’s forecast meeting, on the website listed above.

Upcoming meetings include:

  • Ocean options: State, tribal and federal fishery managers will meet March 7-12 in Vancouver, Wash., with the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) to develop options for this year's commercial and recreational ocean chinook and coho salmon fisheries. The PFMC establishes fishing seasons in ocean waters three to 200 miles off the Pacific coast.
  • Regional discussions: Additional public meetings have been scheduled into April to discuss regional fishery issues. Input from these regional discussions will be considered as the season-setting process moves into the "North of Falcon" and PFMC meetings, which will determine the final 2019 salmon seasons.
  • Final PFMC: The PFMC is expected to adopt final ocean fishing seasons and harvest levels at its April 11-15 meeting in Rohnert Park, Calif. The 2018 salmon fisheries package for Washington's inside waters is scheduled to be completed by the state and tribal co-managers during the PFMC's April meeting.

Beginning in mid-March, fishery proposals will be posted on WDFW's website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/, where the public can submit comments electronically.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is the primary state agency tasked with preserving, protecting and perpetuating fish and wildlife and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing and hunting opportunities.   

COLUMBIA RIVER SPRING CHINOOK SEASONS

posted by Mike on 02/20/2019

Projections of low spring chinook returns constrain Columbia River fishing seasons

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Fishery managers from Washington and Oregon today approved a sport fishery for spring chinook salmon on the Columbia River that reflects a significant reduction in the number of fish available for harvest this year.

According to preseason projections, about 99,300 upriver spring chinook will reach the Columbia this year, down 14 percent from last year and 50 percent below the 10-year average. Those fish return to hatcheries and spawning areas upriver from Bonneville Dam.

In addition, fishery managers are also expecting much lower returns than last year to several major lower Columbia River tributaries, particularly the Cowlitz and Lewis rivers. On the Cowlitz, this year's spring chinook run is projected to reach just 11 percent of the 10-year average and fall short of meeting hatchery production goals.

Ryan Lothrop, Columbia River policy coordinator for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), said those projections are largely the result of poor ocean conditions, which have complicated fisheries management in recent years.

"Anglers will still find some good fishing opportunities in the Columbia River Basin this spring, but conservation has to be our first concern," Lothrop said. "We have a responsibility to protect salmon runs listed under the federal Endangered Species Act and get enough fish back to the spawning grounds and hatcheries to support future runs."

Although salmon fishing is currently open from the mouth of the Columbia River to the Interstate-5 bridge, spring chinook usually don't arrive in large numbers until mid-to-late March. The new fishing regulations approved today will take effect in the following areas:

  • Columbia River below Bonneville Dam: Salmon fishing will open March 1 through April 10 on the Columbia River upstream from Warrior Rock boundary line to Bonneville Dam. Anglers may retain two salmon, two steelhead, or one of each per day, but only one salmon may be a chinook. The lower river downstream from Warrior Rock will be closed to fishing from March 1 through April 10 to conserve spring chinook returning to the Cowlitz and Lewis rivers.
  • Tributaries: The Cowlitz and Lewis rivers will also close to salmon fishing March 1 to conserve spring chinook for hatchery escapement needs, but will remain open for hatchery steelhead retention. The Kalama River will remain open to fishing for salmon and steelhead, but the daily limit of adult salmon will be reduced to one fish on March 1.
  • Columbia River above Bonneville Dam: Waters above Bonneville Dam to the Oregon/Washington state line above McNary Dam will open to salmon fishing April 1 through May 5. Anglers may retain two salmon, two steelhead, or one of each per day, but only one salmon may be a chinook.

In all open waters, only hatchery salmon and steelhead identified by a clipped adipose fin and healed scar may be retained.

Along with new area restrictions in the lower Columbia, fishery managers also reduced initial harvest limits for upriver spring chinook returning to the upper Columbia and Snake rivers. If those fish return as projected, anglers in the Columbia and Snake rivers will be limited to a total of 4,548 fish, compared to 9,052 last year, prior to a run size updated in May.

Lothrop noted that this year's projected return of 99,300 upriver spring chinook is the lowest since 2007, but still well above the record-low return of just 12,800 fish in 1995.

"Experience has shown that warm-water ocean conditions present a challenge to salmon survival," he said. "As in the 1990s, we have observed that cyclical warming effect during the past few years with similar results. During these times, we have to be especially cautious in how we manage the fishery."

Anglers are strongly advised to review the rules for the waters they plan to fish, available on the department's website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/

SALMON LIMIT REDUCED IN MARINE AREA 8-1 & 8-2

posted by Mike on 01/31/2019

Anglers limited to 1 salmon daily in Marine Areas 8-1 and 8-2

Action:  Reduces the daily limit for salmon to one fish.

Effective date:  Feb. 2 through April 30, 2019.

Species affected:  Salmon.

Locations:  Marine areas 8-1 (Deception Pass, Hope Island, Skagit Bay) and 8-2 (Port Susan and Port Gardner).

Reason for action:  Based on current catch estimates, there is not sufficient salmon available to maintain the fishery through the planned season if the daily limit remains at two fish. The change to a one-salmon daily limit is needed to meet conservation objectives and increases the likelihood that the winter fishery will remain open for the entire season.

Additional information:  Anglers are reminded to release all coho and wild chinook in Marine Areas 8-1 and 8-2. Chinook minimum size is 22 inches.

Information contact: David Stormer, Puget Sound recreational salmon manager, (360) 902-0058.

 

OLYMPIC PENINSULA SALMON DERBY - TICKETS

posted by Mike on 01/03/2019

The tickets for the Plympic Peninsula Salmon Derby were dropped off this morning. Tickets are $40.00 per person, and everyone in the boat must have one. 

 

If you need any information you can stop by and we can give you a brochure or you can go on line and see them at www.GardinerSalmonDerby.org .

MARINE AREAS 7,9 & 10 OPEN FOR SALMON FISHING JANUARY 1ST

posted by Mike on 12/27/2018

Finally, we have a number of areas opening for Winter blackmouth this next Tuesday, January 1st, 2019. Marine Areas 7(San Juan Islands), Marine Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet) and Marine Area 10 (Seattle/Bremerton) will open Tuesday, January 1st, 2019. These areas were delayed this season due to large impacts on sub legal fish when these areas opened earlier. By delaying the opener it is hoped that a lager number of fish will have grown to legal size, lessing the impacts on smaller (sub-legal) fish which have caused WDFW to close areas earlier when impact numbers are reached.

Make sure to read your WDFW regulations for the areas you intend to fish as every area is slightly diferent. Please take note that WDFW has changed the Area 10 limit to just a single fish. 

Hopefully, we should see some fairly good sized fish in marine Area 9 & 10 as we have seen some good sized fish landed off the Edmonds Pier this Fall / Winter season. There have been a number of fish landed in the 7 -14 pound range in the past month. This has been the best Fall / Winter season we have seen off the pier, with many of the regulars landing legal fish on a consistant basis. 

If you want to curtail the number of sub - legal fish you encounter consider fishing larger offerings. Going to plugs in the 4 - 5 inch range, such as Silver Hordes or Tomics, will help cut down on the smaller fish. Fishing larger soons in the 4 - 5 inch range will also accomplish curtailing the impacts on smaller fish. Yes, you may not catch as many fish, but the average will be considerably larger. If we lessen the impacts, then we will see a longer season, and just might see a full season, giving us more time on the water.

 

Good Luck To All Of You!

OLYMPIC PENINSULA SALMON DERBY - MARCH 8 - 9 - 10, 2019

posted by Mike on 12/27/2018

It's time to be thinking of participating in the Olympic Peninsula Salmon Deby! It will take palce on March 8th, 9th & 10th this next year. This is the most popular of the Winter Blackmouth Derbies, often called the Iron Man Derby due to the conditions which are endured during the event. There are some "Great" money prizes, with $10,000.00 for 1st prize, $2,00.00 for 2nd and $1,000.00 for 3rd. The are "Mystery Fish" as well as lots of merchandise prizes.

 

You can take a look at the derby website at www.GardinerSalmonDerby.org.

 

Tickets are $40.00 per person, which we will have shortly.

LIMIT TO CHANGE TO ONE SALMON IN MARINE AREA 10 ON JAN 1ST OPENER

posted by Mike on 12/22/2018

Daily limit of one salmon when season opens in Marine Area 10

Action: The daily limit of salmon is one.

Effective date: Jan. 1 through March 31, 2019.

Species affected: Salmon.

Location: Marine Area 10 (Seattle/Bremerton).

Reason for action: Based on abundance estimates, there is not sufficient salmon available to maintain a fishery though the planned season. A daily limit of one salmon will increase the likelihood that the winter fishery will remain open for the entire winter season. 

Additional information: Chinook minimum size is 22 inches. Release all wild Chinook salmon.

For specific regulations, anglers should consult the 2018-19 Washington Sports Fishing Rules pamphlet available online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/.

Anglers can check WDFW's website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/reports_plants.html for the latest information on marine areas that are managed to a quota or guideline.

Information contact: David Stormer, Puget Sound recreational salmon fishery manager, (360) 902-0058 or Mark Baltzell, Puget Sound salmon manager, (360) 902-2807.

 

ANOTHER BLOW TO WASHINGTON SALMON

posted by Mike on 12/18/2018

Chinook fry lost after power outage at Minter Creek Hatchery

OLYMPIA – As many as 6.2 million chinook salmon fry died last weekend when a windstorm cut power to the Minter Creek Hatchery in Pierce County and the facility's backup generator failed.

The fry were in incubators at the Minter Creek Hatchery operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The pump that supplies water to those incubators stopped working when both the main power and backup generator failed.

WDFW staff tried to start the generator and attempted to provide water to the incubators using other methods, but those efforts were largely unsuccessful, said Eric Kinne, WDFW hatchery division manager.

"This is a devastating loss," Kinne said. "The department is conducting an analysis to determine the root cause of what went wrong so that we can improve procedures at Minter Creek and our other hatcheries to help ensure this doesn't happen again."

An inventory of the fish lost includes:

  • 4.2 million Deschutes fall chinook fry
  • 1.5 million Minter Creek fall chinook fry
  • 507,000 White River spring chinook fry

Kinne said the department was raising the White River spring chinook as part of the state's early efforts to provide more food for southern resident orcas, which are listed as endangered both federally and in Washington. The Deschutes and Minter Creek fall chinook were part of WDFW's ongoing hatchery operations that support state fisheries, not new production for orcas.

Other fish – including roughly 4.2 million chum salmon and 2 million coho salmon – being held at Minter Creek Hatchery survived the power outage.

WDFW is determining whether fish from other facilities can replace some of the fry lost at Minter Creek Hatchery, which is located in Gig Harbor. The chinook were scheduled for release in May or June 2019. Chinook typically return to their natal streams to spawn after three to five years in marine waters.

The department operates 80 hatcheries across Washington and raises approximately 68 million chinook annually.

SALMON RETENTION REOPENS ON LEWIS RIVER & CEDAR CHEEK

posted by Mike on 12/04/2018

Salmon retention reopens, area closures lifted on the Lewis River and Cedar Creek

Action:  Restores angling rules on the Lewis River and Cedar Creek to those listed in the 2018-19 Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet.

Effective dates:  Dec. 6, 2018.

Species affected:  All species.

Locations:   Lewis River: from the mouth to Colvin Creek.  Cedar Creek: from the mouth to the Grist Mill Bridge.

Reason for action:  The Lewis River wild fall chinook salmon run has improved and is currently projected to meet the escapement goal for this population. The hatchery coho return has also improved and the hatchery broodstock goal is expected to be met. 

Additional information:  Fishing remains closed on the Lewis River above Colvin Creek under permanent rule, but will reopen on Dec.16.  All other permanent rules remain in effect.  Anglers should refer to the Sport Fishing Rules Pamphlet for complete rule information.

Information Contact: Tom Wadsworth, District Fish Biologist, (360) 906-6709.

 

WINTER BLACKMOUTH OPENS IN MARINE AREAS 8-1 & 8-2 ON SATURDAY DECEMBER 1ST

posted by Mike on 11/24/2018

Next Saturday, December 1st will be the opening of Marine Areas 8-1 & 8-2 for Winter blackmouth fishing. Both areas will be open for hatchery Chinook with a 22 inch minimum size and a two fish limit. Wild Chinook and Coho must be returned. If you do luck into a late returning Chum you may also retain it under your two fish limit. 

On the first weekend we will be fishing an incoming tide both days with the high on Saturday at 12.09 pm (Edmonds) and Sunday at 12.54 pm (Edmonds). During the Winter I find being out there at the crack of dawn less important than the tides. There are a number of reasons for this: 1st: The depth that we are fishing is generally somewhere in the 90 - 200 foot depths, which have little light penatration to those depths. 2nd: Light in general is less intense in the Winter months. 3rd: We are dealing with blackmouth, which are the teenagers of Chinook, and they are generally always hungry.

These areas wil be open until the end of April 2019, unless we exceed our guidelines for Chinook incounters.

LEWIS RIVER & CEDAR CREEK TO SEE FISHING RESTRICTIONS & CLOSURES

posted by Mike on 11/09/2018

Fishing closures set for Lewis River and Cedar Creek

Action: Closes salmon retention on the Lewis River from the mouth to Johnson Creek. Closes the Lewis River to all fishing between Johnson and Colvin creeks. Closes Cedar Creek to all fishing from the mouth to the Grist Mill Bridge.

Effective dates: Nov. 13, 2018 until further notice.

Species affected: All species.

Locations: Lewis River: from the mouth to Colvin Creek. Cedar Creek: from the mouth to the Grist Mill Bridge.

Reason for action: The Lewis River wild fall chinook salmon run is tracking below the pre-season forecast and is currently projected to fall short of the escapement goal for this population. The returns of hatchery coho is also tracking well below forecast and the hatchery broodstock goals. Closing the lower Lewis River and Cedar Creek to salmon retention will increase the number of wild chinook spawning and the number coho returning to the Lewis River Hatchery. The will help to ensure fishing opportunities in future years.

Additional information: The lower Lewis River remains open to harvest of hatchery steelhead downstream of Johnson Creek. All other permanent rules remain in effect. Please refer to the Sport Fishing Pamphlet for complete rule information.

Information contact: Tom Wadsworth, District Fish Biologist, (360) 906-6709.

 

DRANO LAKE TO CLOSE TO ALL FISHING

posted by Mike on 10/16/2018

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE   
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
600 Capitol Way North, Olympia, WA 98501-1091
http://wdfw.wa.gov

October 15, 2018

Drano Lake to close to all fishing

Action: Closes Drano Lake to all fishing.

Effective date: Oct. 17, 2018 until further notice.

Species affected: All species

Location: In the waters downstream of markers on a point of land downstream and across from Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery and upstream of the Highway 14 Bridge.      

Reason for action: The return of fall chinook to Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery is currently projected to be below the number needed to meet egg take goals for 2018. Closing the fishing season in Drano Lake will increase the number of hatchery fish available for broodstock and help ensure future hatchery returns.

Information contact: Matt Gardner, Region 5 Fish Biologist, 360-906-6746

 

YAKIMA RIVER SALMON FISHERY TO CLOSE

posted by Mike on 10/12/2018

Yakima River fall salmon fishery to close

Action: Closes the Yakima River to fishing for salmon.

Effective date: Oct. 18, 2018.

Species affected:  Fall chinook and coho salmon.

Location: From the Hwy. 240 bridge in Richland (river mile 2.1) to the Grant Avenue Bridge in Prosser (river mile 47.0) approximately 1,000 feet downstream of Prosser Dam.

Reason for action: Fall chinook are returning in extremely low numbers to the Yakima River. Closure is necessary to meet conservation and hatchery broodstock collection needs for fall chinook and coho in the Yakima River Basin.  

Information contact: Paul Hoffarth, District 4 fish biologist, (509) 545-2284.

 

HANFORD REACH FALL CHINOOK FISHERY TO CLOSE

posted by Mike on 10/11/2018

Hanford Reach fall chinook fishery to close Oct. 16

Action:  Closes the Columbia River from the Highway 395 Bridge (Pasco/Kennewick) upstream to the old Hanford townsite wooden powerline towers to fishing for fall chinook salmon.

Effective date:  Oct. 16, 2018.

Species affected:  Chinook salmon.

Location:  Highway 395 Bridge (Kennewick/Pasco) upstream to the old Hanford townsite wooden powerline towers.

Reason for action:  Based on the updated return estimate for natural origin Hanford Reach fall chinook, all adult chinook in excess of escapement will be harvested by Oct. 15. 

Additional information:  Anglers are reminded that the remaining sections of the Hanford Reach (the area from the old Hanford townsite wooden powerline towers upstream to Priest Rapids Dam) also closes to salmon fishing Oct. 16 as listed in the 2018-19 Washington Sport Fishing Rules.

Information contact: Paul Hoffarth, District 4 Fish Biologist, (509) 545-2284.

 

TOUTLE AND NORTH FORK TOUTLE TO CLOSE FOR CHINOOK RETENTION

posted by Mike on 10/04/2018

Chinook salmon retention to close on Toutle, North Fork Toutle rivers

Action: Chinook salmon retention closes on the Toutle River and the North Fork Toutle.

Effective dates: October 6, 2018 until further notice. 

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Locations: The Toutle River from the mouth to the forks; the North Fork Toutle River from the mouth to the posted markers downstream of the fish collection facility.

Reason for action: Fall chinook salmon returning to the North Toutle Hatchery, located on the Green River, are tracking well below the pre-season forecast and are not currently projected to meet the hatchery broodstock goal. These fish must first migrate through the Toutle and North Fork Toutle rivers. Closing the Toutle River and North Fork Toutle River to chinook salmon retention will increase the number of hatchery fish available for broodstock and help ensure fishing opportunities in future years.

Additional information: The Green River is also currently closed to chinook retention. Retention of hatchery coho remains open on the Toutle, North Fork Toutle and Green rivers. All other permanent rules remain in effect. Please refer to the Sport Fishing Pamphlet for complete rule information.

Information contact: Tom Wadsworth, District Fish Biologist, (360) 906-6709.

 

WASHOUGAL RIVER CLOSING TO CHINOOK RETENTION

posted by Mike on 09/18/2018

Washougal River to close to the retention of chinook salmon

Action: Closes the Washougal River to retention of hatchery chinook salmon.

Effective Dates:  Sept. 22, 2018, until further notice. 

Species affected:  Chinook salmon.

Locations:  Washougal River from the mouth to the bridge at Salmon Falls, and Camus Slough.

Reason for action: The Washougal River fall chinook salmon run is tracking far below the pre-season forecast and is currently projected not to meet the hatchery broodstock goal. Closing the river to chinook retention will increase the number of hatchery fish available for broodstock and help ensure fishing opportunities in future years.

Additional information: Camas Slough is currently closed for retention of hatchery steelhead due to closures on the mainstem Columbia River.  This fishing rule change closes Camas Slough to retention of hatchery chinook while it is in effect. 

The Washougal River remains open for retention of hatchery steelhead and hatchery coho salmon until further notice. All other permanent rules remain in effect. Please refer to the Sport Fishing Pamphlet for complete rule information.

Information Contact:  Region 5, (360) 696-6211. For the latest information, press *1010.

 

LOWER COWLITZ RIVER CLOSING TO CHINOOK FISHING

posted by Mike on 09/18/2018

Chinook salmon retention to close on the lower Cowlitz River

Action: Chinook salmon retention closes on the lower Cowlitz River and tributaries (except the Toutle River).

Effective dates: Sept. 22, 2018 until further notice. 

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Locations: The Cowlitz River and tributaries (except the Toutle River) from the mouth to the Barrier Dam.

Reason for action: The Cowlitz River fall chinook salmon run is tracking far below the pre-season forecast and is currently projected not to meet the hatchery broodstock goal. Closing the lower Cowlitz River to chinook salmon retention will increase the number of hatchery fish available for broodstock and help ensure fishing opportunities in future years.

Additional information: The lower Cowlitz River remains open to harvest of hatchery coho salmon and hatchery steelhead until further notice. The closed waters section below the Barrier Dam will remain 400', at the posted markers, until further notice. All other permanent rules remain in effect. Please refer to the Sport Fishing Pamphlet for complete rule information.

Information Contact: Tom Wadsworth, District Fish Biologist, (360) 906-6709.

 

CHINOOK LIMIT DECREASED TO ONE ADULT IN HANFORD REACH SECTION OF COLUMBIA

posted by Mike on 09/13/2018

Anglers limited to one adult fall chinook in the Hanford Reach

Action: Reduces the daily limit to one adult fall chinook from the Highway 395 Bridge (Pasco/Kennewick) upstream to Priest Rapids Dam. Prohibits retention of coho salmon.

Effective dates and locations:

  • Sept. 15 through Oct. 31, 2018 from Hwy. 395 Bridge (Pasco/Kennewick) to the Old Hanford townsite wooden powerline towers
  • Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, 2018 from the Old Hanford townsite wooden powerline towers to Priest Rapids Dam.

Species affected:  Fall chinook and coho.

Location: Highway 395 Bridge (Kennewick/Pasco) upstream to the Priest Rapids Dam.

Reason for action: The upriver bright fall chinook escapement goal for the Hanford Reach is 31,100 adult chinook. Fall chinook and coho salmon are returning to the Columbia River well below the forecast. Reduction of the daily limit to one adult fall chinook will provide anglers the opportunity to continue to harvest available fall chinook salmon and still meet conservation goals for escapement of upriver bright fall chinook in the Hanford Reach.

Closure of retention of coho in the Hanford Reach fishery will contribute in efforts to meet hatchery coho broodstock collection and escapement targets destined to return to upper Columbia River tributaries.

Additional information: The daily limit is six salmon with up to one adult fall chinook. Release all coho and sockeye. Anglers must stop fishing for salmon after the adult portion of the daily limit is retained.

Information contact: Paul Hoffarth, District 4 Fish Biologist, (509) 545-2284.

 

LOWER SAMISH RIVER CLOSING TO ALL FISHING

posted by Mike on 09/13/2018

Lower Samish River to close to all fishing

Action: Close part of the Samish River to all fishing.

Effective dates:  Sept.15, 2018 until further notice.

Species affected: All species.

Location: From the mouth (Bayview –Edison Road) to I-5 bridge

Reasons for action: The return of fall chinook to the Samish Hatchery is currently projected to be below the number needed to meet egg take goals for 2018. Closing the fishing season in the lower Samish River will increase the number of hatchery fish available for broodstock and help ensure future hatchery returns.

Other information: The season will be reopened if egg take needs are projected to be met. Please refer to https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/ for further information on seasons.

Information Contact: Mill Creek Regional Office, 425 775-1311

 

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