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Reports

Halibut Quotas Set For Pacific Coast

posted by Mike on 02/04/2016

 

Friday, 29 January 2016 14:43

The International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC) completed its Ninety-second Annual Meeting in Juneau, AK on January 29, 2016.  More than 280 halibut industry stakeholders attended the meeting, with over 80 more participating in web broadcasts of the public sessions.

The Commission is recommending to the governments of Canada and the United States catch limits for 2016 totaling 29.89 million pounds, displayed in the following table by regulatory area.

 

2016 Catch Limits

 

Regulatory Area

Catch Limit

(pounds)

Area 2A (California, Oregon, and Washington)

   Non-treaty directed commercial (south of Pt. Chehalis)

   Non-treaty incidental catch in salmon troll fishery

   Non-treaty incidental catch in sablefish fishery (north of Pt. Chehalis)

   Treaty Indian commercial               

   Treaty Indian ceremonial and subsistence (year-round)

   Sport – Washington

   Sport – Oregon

   Sport – California

Area 2B (British Columbia) (includes sport catch allocation)

Area 2C (southeastern Alaska) (combined commercial/guided sport)1

   Commercial fishery (3,924,000 catch and 120,000 incidental mortality)

   Guided sport fishery

Area 3A (central Gulf of Alaska) (combined commercial/guided sport)1

   Commercial  fishery (7,336,000 catch and 450,000 incidental mortality)

   Guided sport fishery

Area 3B (western Gulf of Alaska)

Area 4A (eastern Aleutians)

Area 4B (central/western Aleutians)

Areas 4CDE

   Area 4C (Pribilof Islands)

   Area 4D (northwestern Bering Sea)

   Area 4E (Bering Sea flats)

1,140,000

193,364

34,123

49,686

365,100

33,900

214,110

220,077

29,640

7,300,000

4,950,000

4,044,000

906,000

9,600,000

7,786,000

1,814,000

2,710,000

1,390,000

1,140,000

1,660,000

733,600

733,600

192,800

Total 29,890,000

1The combined total includes estimated mortality from regulatory discards of sublegal halibut and lost gear in the commercial fishery, plus discard mortality in the guided sport fishery, as mandated in the U.S. Catch Sharing Plans.

New Steelhead Fishing Opportunities On The Wenatchee & Icicle Rivers

posted by Mike on 02/04/2016

Steelhead fishing expands on Wenatchee and Icicle rivers

 

Actions: Open the Icicle River and additional sections of the Wenatchee River above Leavenworth on Feb. 4, 2016 to fishing for hatchery steelhead.

Species affected: Steelhead

Areas that will open to fishing for steelhead one hour before sunrise on Feb. 4, 2016 until further notice include:

1) Wenatchee River: From the Icicle Road Bridge to 400 feet below Tumwater Dam.

2) Icicle River: From the mouth to 500 feet downstream from the Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery Barrier Dam.

Reason for changes: Recent analysis of ongoing steelhead fisheries in the upper Columbia River shows that extending the fishery in the upper basin of the Wenatchee River should not exceed impact limits on natural-origin steelhead established by NOAA-Fisheries under section 10 of the federal Endangered Species Act. Expanding the fishery on the Wenatchee River will increase fishing opportunities for hatchery steelhead, reduce the proportion of hatchery fish on the spawning grounds, and further reduce competition between natural origin and hatchery juvenile production.

Ongoing regulations:

Areas that will continue to be open for steelhead angling until further notice include:

1) Columbia River: From Rock Island Dam to the powerlines crossing the Columbia River at Daroga State Park.

2) Columbia River: From the Hwy 173 bridge at Brewster to 400 feet below Chief Joseph Dam

3) Wenatchee River: From the mouth to the Icicle Road Bridge. Fishing within 400 ft downstream of Dryden Dam is prohibited.

4) Entiat River: From the mouth to approximately 1/2 mile upstream to a point perpendicular with the intersection of the Entiat River Road and Hedding Street.

5) Similkameen River: From the mouth to 400 feet below Enloe Dam.

6) Okanogan River: From the mouth to the Highway 97 Bridge in Oroville.

General rules for all locations open to steelhead fishing:

1) Mandatory retention of hatchery steelhead, as identified by a missing adipose fin with a healed scar at the location of the clipped fin.

2) Daily limit of two (2) hatchery steelhead; 20 inch minimum size.

3) Daily limit of five (5) hatchery rainbow trout of less than 20 inches in total length, as identified by a missing adipose fin with a healed scar at the location of the clipped fin.

4) Anglers must stop fishing when a daily limit of two (2) hatchery steelhead are obtained, regardless of the number of hatchery rainbow trout obtained.

5) Selective gear rules and night closure are in effect for all steelhead fishery areas, except the use of bait is allowed on the mainstem Columbia River.

6) Steelhead with an intact adipose fin must be released unharmed and cannot be removed from the water prior to release.

7) Release all steelhead with a floy (anchor) tag attached and/or one or more round 1/4 inch in diameter holes punched in the caudal (tail) fin.

8) Motorized vessels are not allowed on the Wenatchee and Icicle rivers (Chelan County ordinance 7.20.190 Motorboat restrictions).

Other information:

Anglers should be aware that fishing rules are subject to change and that rivers can close at any time due to impacts on natural origin steelhead. Adhering to the mandatory retention of adipose clipped steelhead is vital in allowing the fishery to continue and to provide the maximum benefit to natural origin fish.

All anglers must possess a valid fishing license and a Columbia River Salmon/Steelhead Endorsement to participate in these fisheries. Revenue from the endorsement supports salmon or steelhead seasons on many rivers in the Columbia River system, including enforcing fishery regulations and monitoring the upper Columbia River steelhead fisheries. The endorsement has generated more than $1 million annually for WDFW to maintain and increase fishing opportunities throughout the Columbia River Basin.

Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license, appropriate to the fishery. Check the WDFW "Fishing in Washington" rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations. Fishing rules are subject to change. Check the WDFW Fishing hotline for the latest rule information at (360) 902-2500, press 2 for recreational rules. For the Shellfish Rule Change hotline call (360)796-3215 or toll free 1-866-880-5431.

Information contacts: Travis Maitland, Wenatchee District 7 Fish Biologist, (509) 665-3337; Ryan Fortier, Methow-Okanogan District 6 Fish Biologist, (509) 997-0316; Jeff Korth, Region 2 Fish Program Manager, (509) 754-4624.

Long Beach Razor Clam Digs Scheduled For February

posted by Mike on 01/30/2016

WDFW approves month-long razor clam dig at Long Beach

OLYMPIA – Razor clam diggers can look forward to more than a month of razor clam digging opportunities at Long Beach on the Washington coast.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig, which runs from Feb. 4 through March 10, at Long Beach after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat.

All other beaches remain closed to recreational razor clam digging.

The department approved this extended opening due to the abundance of clams available at Long Beach, said Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager.

“We had a late start to the digging season, so we still have plenty of clams to dig at Long Beach,” Ayres said.  “We’re thrilled to be able to announce this lengthy opening.” 

The dig at Long Beach is on evening tides. No digging will be allowed before noon any day. Diggers should check tide charts before heading out, since tides of one foot or above aren’t conducive to digging, Ayres said.

“For the best digging conditions, we advise people to plan their trips to the beach when the evening low tides are less than one foot,” Ayres said.

Ayres noted the best digging usually occurs one to two hours prior to low tide

The first week of the upcoming dig at Long Beach is scheduled on the following dates and low tides:

  • Feb. 4, Thursday, 3:41 p.m.; 0.8 feet, Long Beach,
  • Feb. 5, Friday, 4:28 p.m.; 0.2 feet, Long Beach
  • Feb. 6, Saturday, 5:11 p.m.; -0.3 feet, Long Beach
  • Feb. 7, Sunday, 5:52 p.m.; -0.7 feet, Long Beach
  • Feb. 8, Monday, 6:32 p.m.; -1.0 feet, Long Beach
  • Feb. 9, Tuesday, 7:12 p.m.; -0.9 feet, Long Beach
  • Feb. 10, Wednesday, 7:52 p.m.; -0.7 feet, Long Beach
  • Download full list of upcoming dig times and low tides

Additionally, a list of tides will be posted on WDFW’s razor clam webpage http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/ Diggers should also check the website for announcements about openings at other Washington beaches.

Although toxin tests at Copalis beach show clams are safe to eat, shellfish managers are limiting digging there to help ensure the beach will have openings throughout the spring.

“Copalis was the first beach to open this season and we’ve already harvested nearly 40 percent of our annual quota,” Ayres said.

Razor clam digging will remain closed on Washington’s other coastal beaches until domoic acid levels drop below the threshold of 20 parts per million set by state public health officials. The natural toxin produced by certain types of marine algae can be harmful or even fatal if consumed in sufficient quantities.

WDFW is continuing to monitor toxin levels on all Washington beaches and will open other areas as soon as clams are safe to eat. Toxin test results can be found on WDFW’s domoic acid webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/domoic_levels.html

Diggers should monitor WDFW’s main razor clam webpage for any potential changes to the Long Beach opening.

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2015-16 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Salmon Anglers - Marine Area 6 Chinook Salmon Reduced To One - Effective February 5th 2016

posted by Mike on 01/29/2016

Anglers limited to 1 chinook per day in Marine Area 6

 

Action: The daily catch limit for chinook salmon in Marine Area 6 (East Juan de Fuca Strait) will be reduced to 1 fish, with a 2 salmon limit. All wild chinook salmon must be released.

Effective Date: Feb. 5 through April 10, 2016.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Location: Marine Area 6 within Puget Sound.

Reason for action: Before the salmon fishing season started, WDFW and tribal co-managers agreed to a limited number (2,586) of chinook encounters ? retaining or releasing fish ? anglers are allowed in Marine Area 6. Preliminary estimates indicate that anglers have reached 71 percent of those encounters. The fishery is being modified to control impacts on stocks of concern.

Other information: WDFW will continue to monitor and evaluate the fishery in order to help maximize fishing opportunity is available for Marine Area 6. Anglers are reminded that they must continue to release all wild chinook.

Information contact: Ryan Lothrop, (360) 902-2808.

Chinook, Sturgeon & Smelt Information For The Columbia River And Cowlitz River

posted by Mike on 01/29/2016

States set seasons for spring chinook,
sturgeon, smelt in Columbia River Basin

 

 

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Anticipating a return of 299,200 adult spring chinook salmon, fishery managers from Washington and Oregon today set this year’s initial fishing season to run through April 9 on the lower Columbia River.

In addition, representatives from the two states agreed to close the winter sturgeon retention fishery in the Bonneville Pool effective Feb. 8 and approved a six-hour recreational smelt season Feb. 6 on the Cowlitz River.

Here are the major provisions of those agreements:

  • Spring chinook: From March 1 through April 9, anglers fishing downriver from Bonneville Dam may retain one marked, hatchery-reared adult spring chinook as part of their daily catch limit. The fishery will be open to both boat and bank anglers upriver to Beacon Rock, and – for bank anglers only – from there upriver to the fishing boundary just below the dam.

    The sport fishery will close in all areas of the lower Columbia River on two Tuesdays – March 29 and April 5 – to accommodate potential commercial fisheries.

    Upstream of Bonneville Dam, anglers may retain one hatchery-reared adult spring chinook per day from March 16 through May 6 between the Tower Island powerlines and the Washington/Oregon state line. Bank anglers using hand-casted gear (no boats) can also fish from Bonneville Dam upriver to the Tower Island powerlines during that time.

    Barbless hooks are required to fish for spring chinook in the Columbia River and anglers must release any salmon or steelhead not visibly marked as a hatchery fish by a clipped adipose fin.
  • Sturgeon: The recreational sturgeon retention fishery between Bonneville Dam and The Dalles Dam will close Feb. 8. By that time, fishery managers expect that anglers will have reeled in 140 sturgeon from those waters, leaving 185 available for a one-or-two day fishery in summer. Catch-and-release fishing remains an option until then.
  • Smelt: As in the past two years, fishery managers approved a limited fishery for smelt on the Cowlitz River to help gather data on the species’ abundance. Recreational smelt dipping will be restricted to the hours of 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 6. The limit per person is 10 pounds – about one-quarter of a five-gallon bucket. Smelt dipping is not allowed from boats.

    To support the data-collection effort, the two states also approved a limited gillnet fishery for smelt in February on the lower Columbia River. The area’s smelt population was listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 2010, but runs have shown some signs of improvement since then.

Fishing rules reflecting these actions are available on the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (WDFW) website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/

Fishing for spring chinook is currently open on a daily basis from Buoy 10 near the mouth of the Columbia River upstream to the Interstate 5 Bridge, although the bulk of the run doesn’t arrive until mid-March when the new fishing rules will be in effect.

Catch guidelines approved for the popular fishery will allow anglers fishing below Bonneville Dam to catch approximately 9,100 hatchery-raised “springers” before an updated run forecast is completed in late April or early May.

Another 1,000 adult upriver chinook are reserved for anglers fishing upriver from Bonneville Dam to the Washington/Oregon state line, 17 miles above McNary Dam. Additional fish have also been reserved for the Snake River sport fishery.

After banner spring chinook returns in each of the past two years, the projected run of 299,200 adult fish for 2016 is still slightly above the recent 10-year average, said Ron Roler, WDFW Columbia River policy manager. However, while this year’s projected run of upriver fish is down by about 100,000 fish from last year, he said returns to some tributaries – notably the Cowlitz and Kalama rivers – show an increase this year.

“Salmon returns rise and fall from year to year, especially during the kind of cyclical ocean changes we’re seeing right now,” Roler said. “Even so, if this run comes in as projected, it will still be the ninth-largest return in more than 25 years. We’re expecting plenty of fish to support a great fishing season.”

As in previous years, Washington and Oregon will manage the fishery with a 30 percent buffer on the upriver chinook forecast until the results of the in-season run update are known.

“We’ll continue to take a conservative approach in managing the fishery,” Roler said. “If the fish return at or above expectations, we will look toward providing additional days of fishing on the river later in the spring.”

January 31st Is Last Day To Get Your Winter Catch Record Cards Returned

posted by Mike on 01/28/2016

Make sure to get your winter Crab Catch Record Card returned to WDFW or go online to submit your catch information. You have through January 31st to do such. You don't want to give the state $10.00 for that Crab Administrative Fee assessed you for not turning it in when you purchase your 2016 shelfish lisence.

Last Day For Fishing Most Puget Sound Rivers Is January 31st

posted by Mike on 01/28/2016

January 31st marks the last day that fishing will be open on most Puget Sound rivers. The only exceptions are some of the terminal hatchery areas that will remain open though February 15th allowing the retention of surplus hatchery steelhead. If you are not familiar with the particular regulations on your river of choice make sure to consult your copy of the WDFW regulations.

 

With the additional 2 weeks of fishing in the hatchery area not only does this allow at least a little additional fishing opprotunity but allows additional hatchery steelhead to be taken lessing the potential of inter action between hatchery and wild stocks.

Lake Chelan Fishing Report For 1/26/2016 From Anton Jones Of Darrell & Dad's Family Guide Service

posted by Mike on 01/26/2016

Lake Chelan Are Fishing Report for 1/26/16

    What continues hot is trolling the Barrens for Lake Trout on Lake Chelan and catching Kokanee uplake from the Narrows, trolling in depths of 100 to 500 feet deep. 

 

    Working depths of 185 to 210 feet in the Barrens at speeds of 1 to 1.2 mph within 5 feet of the bottom continues to be very productive.  Jeff’s Drifts and Mack’s Lures Cha Cha Squidders have produced numbers of fish from two to five pounds.  Bait those with a piece of Northern Pikeminnow if you still have some. 

 

    Up above the Narrows, fish Colyar’s ledge with Mack’s Lures mini cha cha Squidders in orange and pink for nice kokanee.  Bait those lures with Pautzke’s Fire Corn.  That same 1 to 1.2mph is a great speed to start at.  Adjust it as you determine if the fish want those squddy’s faster or slower.  You should fish just above or through suspended schools from 50 to 220 feet deep over bottoms from 100 to 500 feet deep.  The odd Landlocked Chinook and suspended Mack is a bonus.

 

    Your fishing tip of the week is to be very active when trolling for Lakers and Kokanee on Chelan.  With the Lakers you must be constantly working to keep your gear tight to the bottom.  If you drag you will either snag or foul your terminal gear up with bottom debris.  For every 10 feet you are off the bottom you cut your bite rate in half.  You have to keep moving your gear for Kokanee right above their heads.  They are anywhere from 45 feet to over 200.  Keep your head in the game! 

 

    The kid’s tip of the week is to teach negotiation as a strategy to avoid worse behaviors.  A lot of the time you can avoid pouting, tantrums and “shutting down” by using your adult brain and negotiating a solution.  It not only avoids the whole disciplinary cycle, but also models an alternative strategy.  To excess, it can “create a monster”, but all in all, modeling negotiations to get what you want gives kids another more acceptable tool in their people skills tool box. 

 

    The safety tip of the week is to watch the dock on Chelan before the sun hits them.  Sometimes the ice is nearly invisible.  Falling down is only funny on TV. 

 

Don’t forget that our Winter Specials runs through February 15th.  This is a great time to cure cabin fever with a fishing trip to beautiful Lake Chelan.

 

Pictured:  1/16/16 - Ray Lingle of Chelan with son, Jared of Yakima with their days catch of Lake Chelan Kokanee, Macks  and a nice 6.1 pound King.

 

Also Pictured:  1/16/16 - Mr. Lingle again with that nice chrome King!

 

Also, Also Pictured:  1/19/16 - Jesse McWain and friend Bill from East Wenatchee with their days catch of Barrens Mackinaw.  Big fish of 10.8 pounds

 

Finally Pictured:  1/19/16 - Jesse again with that 10.8 pound Mack

DARRELL & DAD’S FAMILY GUIDE SERVICE

509-687-0709

www.darrellanddads.com

check out our Facebook Page

 
 
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Blackmouth Reports From Marine Area 9

posted by Mike on 01/21/2016

The reports we have been getting from Area 9 have not been good since the opener this past Saturday. The weather has been a major problem with anglers finding very little time to fish. When they have been out they have not been finding much but shakers or fish barely legal. Hopefully the weather will cooperate allowing anglers more time on the water and hopefully being able to find some areas where there are some better fish. Time will tell!

Razor Clam Digs Approved For Coplais & Long Beach For January 21 Through January 27th, 2016

posted by Mike on 01/20/2016

Razor clam dig approved Jan. 21 through Jan. 27 at Copalis and Long Beach

 

Action: Opens Razor clam season

Effective date: 12:01 p.m. Jan. 21 through 11:59 p.m. Jan 27, 2016

Digging is only allowed from: 12:01 p.m. through 11:59 p.m. each day.

Species affected: Razor clams

The specific low tides for this opener:

Jan. 21, Thursday, 4: 49 p.m.; - 0.4 feet, Long Beach

Jan. 22, Friday, 5: 35 p.m.; -0.7 feet, Long Beach, Copalis

Jan. 23, Saturday, 6: 16 p.m.; -0.8 feet, Long Beach

Jan. 24, Sunday, 6: 54 p.m.; -0.7 feet, Long Beach

Jan. 25, Monday, 7: 31 p.m.; -0.4 feet, Long Beach

Jan. 26, Tuesday, 8: 05 p.m.; 0.0 feet, Long Beach

Jan. 27, Wednesday, 8: 39 p.m.; 0.5 feet, Long Beach

Location:

Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River,and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.

Reason for action: Harvestable numbers of razor clams are available.

Information contact: Dan Ayres (360) 249-4628, Region 6 Montesano v

Lake Chelan Report For 1/16/16 From Anton Jones Of Darrell & Dad's Family Guide Service

posted by Mike on 01/16/2016

v

  LAKE CHELAN AREA FISHING REPORT FOR 1/16/16

 

    What’s hot into the middle of January is trolling the Barrens for Lake Trout on Lake Chelan.  Heating up is catching Kokanee uplake from the Narrows, trolling in depths of 100 to 500 feet deep.  Also hot, for those of you longing for a warmer climate is trolling for multiple species out of Cabo San Lucas. 

 

    Working depths of 185 to 210 feet in the Barrens at speeds of 1 to 1.2 mph within 5 feet of the bottom continues to be very productive.  Jeff’s Drifts and Mack’s Lures Cha Cha Squidders have produced numbers of fish from two to five pounds as well as a monster Mack. 

 

    Up above the Narrows, fish Colyar’s ledge with Mack’s Lures mini cha cha Squidders in orange and pink for nice kokanee.  Bait those lures with Pautzke’s Fire Corn.  The odd suspended Mack or fin clipped cutthroat is a bonus.  You should fish just above or through suspended schools from 50 to 220 feet deep over bottoms from 100 to 500 feet deep. 

 

    Slow trolling live baits on either the Sea of Cortez or Pacific side of Cabo San Lucas produced 13 species of fish in a week of fishing.  Dorado and wahoo were the most common fish, with a whopper Striped Marlin and an ultra light gear Rooster fish thrown in for good measure.  It was a great break from winter!  

 

    Your fishing tip of the week is to remember scent when fishing.  We like to smear all our hard lures with Pautzke’s Krill Juice for trout and salmon.  We believe this works as a cover scent so fish committed to biting will not shy away at the last moment. 

 

    The kid’s tip of the week is plain common sense.  Since kid’s bodies have less mass than ours, they are less tolerant of cold than adults.  Give them an extra layer.  Build a warming fire where safe and legal.  Take warming breaks in the vehicle where fires won’t work.  Keep the sessions short.  Make sure it is fun so they will want to do it again.  Especially pay attention to their fingers and toes. 

 

    The safety tip of the week is to use this slower time of the year to make sure your safety gear has been checked and is in shape for the peak boating season.  Fire extinguishers need to be recharged and inspected.  Replace used or worn items.  For us that is usually band aids and anti-inflammatories like aspirin, Tylenol and Ibuprofen.  Check lifejackets and throwable cushions for worn spots and tears to be repaired or replaced as needed.  Make a list and check the items off.

 

Pictured:  1/7/16 - Guide Jeff Witkowski with his 27.6 lb Barrens caught Mack!

 

Also Pictured:  1/9/16 - Mack's Lures, Bobby Loomis with Jeff and his catch of Lakers, Kokanee and a clipped Cutt.

 

Finally Pictured:  1/8/16 - The old man himself with son-in-law Mike Wilson of Spangle with a 20 lb Rooster Fish caught on ultra-light tackle on the Pacific side of Cabo San Lucas.

 

 
 
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Winter Crab Catch Records Need To Be Returned

posted by Mike on 01/15/2016

Make sure that you send your 2015 Winter Crab Catch Records to WDFW or report them on line (htts:fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/wa/crabreport). If you don't you will be assessed a $10.00 administrative fee when you go to purchase your 2016 licenses. Better to spend the $10.00 on tackle than to give it to the state!
 

Marine Area 9 - Admiralty Inlet Opens For Salmon Saturday January 16th, 2016

posted by Mike on 01/15/2016

Salmon fishermen have been looking forward to this opener after the WDFW closure of our November fishery due to the large number of immature wild Chinook that were in the area. These impacts on these wild Chinook being the driver for closures of our fisheries. Hopefully, the greatest number of these fish have left our area as not to eat up our impacts causing an early closure of our fishing. Our fishery is to open tomorrow and run through April 15th. The limit is two salmon with Chinook having to be a minimum of 22 inches and all WILD Chinook must be released.

 

Tides look good for tomorrows opener. A good incoming tide for the first thing in the morning. Not a bad tide for fishing Pilot Point, Tin Shed or Possession Bar. A little stronger out going tide after the high than I normally like but still fishable. Will be a good outgoing tide later in the morning though the afternoon giving those mooching Point No Point a good opportunity. Likewise those wanting to make the run up to Port Townsend should find the outgoing tides good for fishing Mid - Channel Bank.

Morning Low Tide - 2:57AM - 2.5

Morning High Tide - 9:37AM - 12.7

Afternoon Low Tide - 4:23 - 2.7

Evening High Tide - 10:22 - 8.6

 

If you have any questions feel free to stop by. We have lots of Green Package Herring in stock as well as Yellow for those wanting baits to fit heads. We'll be glad to help you in any way we can.

 

Good Luck!

 

 

Nisqually River Closes To All Fishing Effective January 6,2016

posted by Mike on 01/07/2016

Closure of Nisqually River to recreational fishing

 

Action: Close Nisqually River to recreational angling.

Effective dates: Jan. 6, 2016

Species affected: All species.

Location: Nisqually River (Pierce County) from the mouth to the military tank crossing bridge (located one mile upstream of mouth of Muck Creek).

Reasons for action: Based on spawner surveys and harvest information available to date, WDFW and the Nisqually Indian Tribe are concerned that the winter chum return to the Nisqually River is not as abundant as forecast and has the potential to fall short of our escapement goal. Given this information and the need to achieve our shared conservation goals, both WDFW and the Nisqually Tribe are closing their respective fisheries.

Other information: Anglers should refer to the 2015/2016 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet for other ongoing fishing opportunities.

Information Contact: James Losee: (360) 902-2741, james.losee@dfw.wa.gov

Puget Sound Shrimp Season To Open Saturday May 14th, 2016

posted by Mike on 01/07/2016

Puget Sound recreational shrimp fishery will open May 14

 

 

OLYMPIA – Recreational spot shrimp fishing in Puget Sound will open Saturday, May 14 – one week later than usual, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) announced today.

Shellfish managers are delaying the popular shrimp fishery until May 14 due to the extremely low tides that are expected to occur midday on the first Saturday in May, which traditionally marks the start of the season throughout Puget Sound.

Low tides of this magnitude will render many boat ramps around Puget Sound unusable for several hours and create poor shrimping conditions, said Mark O’Toole, shellfish biologist for WDFW.

“We’re pushing the season opener to May 14 to allow shrimpers to get the most out of the limited number of days that many marine areas, including Hood Canal, are open each year,” O’Toole said.

WDFW is announcing this change now to give shrimp fishers time to adjust motel or moorage reservations and vacation requests to the second weekend of May, he said.

In past years, the department has adjusted shrimp fishing days later in the season to avoid significantly low tides, but not the season opening date. After 2016, there will not be another extreme low tide on the first Saturday in May until 2021.

WDFW will wait to announce the remainder of the shrimp fishing dates for each marine area until the final 2016 harvest quotas have been determined, likely sometime in February.

“In general, we expect shrimping opportunities in most marine areas to be similar to last year,” O’Toole said.

For the latest information on sport shrimp seasons, or for a description of marine areas, visit WDFW’s recreational shrimp fishing website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/shrimp/

Special Prices On Loomis GL2 Steelhead Rods - 25% Off

posted by Mike on 01/05/2016

We are discounting all of our Loomis GL2 steelhead rods. If you have been looking to purchase one or want an additional one, there is no better time than now. We will be giving 25% off the regular prices. If you live outside of the immediate area will will also ship them - No Charge! Here's a run down on what we have on hand! Stop by or give us a call!

 

2ea STR 1263C GL2 Regular Price 345.00 - Special Price 258.75

10ea HSR 1021C GL2 Regular Price 265.00 - Special Price 198.75

1ea HSR 1021S GL2 Regular Price 265.00 - Special Price 198.75

7ea HSR 1023C GL2 Regular Price 275.00 - Special Price 206.25

5ea HSR 1025C GL2 Regular Price 285.00 - Special Price 213.75

2ea STR 1025S GL2 Regular Price 250.00 - Special Price 187.50

4ea STR 1084S GL2 Regular Price 260.00 - Special Price 195.00

4ea STR 1083S GL2 Regular Price 250.00 - Special Price 187.50

2ea STR 1264C GL2 Regular Price 275.00 - Special Price 206.25

1ea STR 1265-BC GL2 Regular Price 290.00 - Special Price 217.50

1ea STR 1264C GL2 Regular Price 275.00 - Special Price 206.25

1ea STR 1265C GL2 Regular Price 270.00 - Special Price 202.50

1ea STR 1082S GL2 Regular Price 240.00 - Special Price 180.00

5ea STR 1025C GL2 Regular Price 250.00 - Special Price 187.50

3ea STR 1084C GL2 Regular Price 260.00 - Special Price 195.00

2ea STR 1024S GL2 Regular Price 245.00 - Special Price 183.75

1ea STR 1265S GL2 Regular Price 275.00 - Special Price 206.25

7ea STR 1024C GL2 Regular Price 245.00 - Special Price 183.75

2ea STR 1086C GL2 Regular Price 260.00 - Special Price 195.00

 

This is what we have left in our GL2 inventory. If you are interested stop by or give us a call. (425) 743-9505.

 

All sales are subject to what we have on hand.

Razor Clam Digs Scheduled For Copalis & Long Beach For January 7th - 14th

posted by Mike on 01/05/2016

Razor Clams

Map of Razor Clam Beaches

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:

Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.

Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.

Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

January 4, 2016

Contact: Dan Ayres, (360) 249-4628

WDFW approves razor clam digs at Copalis and Long Beach

OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers have approved razor clam digs starting later this week at Long Beach and Copalis Beach.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) confirmed the digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams on those two beaches are safe to eat. All other beaches remain closed to recreational razor clam digging.

Digs at both beaches are on evening tides and include a two-day opening (Jan. 8 and 9) at Copalis and an eight-day dig (Jan. 7 to 14) at Long Beach.

“The season opener at Copalis over the Christmas holiday was a huge success with most diggers filling their limits,” said Dan Ayres, coastal shellfish manager for WDFW.

“We’re excited that we can open Long Beach for the first time this season.” 

Razor clam digging will remain closed on Washington’s other coastal beaches until domoic acid levels drop below the threshold (20 parts per million) set by state public health officials.

Domoic acid posed a problem for shellfish fisheries along Washington’s coast for much of 2015. The natural toxin produced by certain types of marine algae can be harmful or even fatal if consumed in sufficient quantities. Cooking or freezing does not destroy domoic acid in shellfish.

WDFW is continuing to monitor toxin levels on all Washington beaches and will open other areas as soon as clams are safe to eat.

The upcoming dig is scheduled on the following dates, beaches, and low tides:

  • Jan. 7, Thursday, 4:57 p.m.; 0.1 feet, Long Beach
  • Jan. 8, Friday, 5:37 p.m.; -0.4 feet, Long Beach, Copalis
  • Jan. 9, Saturday, 6:16 p.m.; -0.8 feet, Long Beach, Copalis
  • Jan. 10, Sunday, 6:55 p.m.; -1.0 feet, Long Beach
  • Jan. 11, Monday, 7:34 p.m.; -1.0 feet, Long Beach
  • Jan. 12, Tuesday, 8:14 p.m.; -0.8 feet, Long Beach
  • Jan. 13, Wednesday, 8:56 p.m.; -0.4 feet, Long Beach
  • Jan. 14, Thursday, 9:40 p.m.; 0.2 feet, Long Beach

Ayres noted the best digging usually occurs one to two hours prior to low tide.

Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2015-16 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Comprehensive information about razor clams – from updates on tentative digs to how-to advice on digging and cooking – is available at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/.

For more information on this season check out:
Washington Razor Clam Management Briefing: Setting the 2015-2016 Season


 

End Of The Year Report From Lake Chelan From Anton Jones Of Darrell & Dad's Family Guide Service

posted by Mike on 01/02/2016

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LAKE CHELAN AREA FISHING REPORT FOR 12/28/15

Winter fishing for Mackinaw continues to be hot on Lake Chelan during the Christmas holiday period.  Heating up is winter Kokanee fishing around Colyar Ledge.  We troll for these Lakers from 180 to 245 feet deep in the Barrens and the Trench.  Fish within 3 to 5 feet of the bottom and keep your speed around .8 to 1.3 mph.  Glow in the dark Smile Blades from Mack’s Lure continue to be the go to attractor here on Lake Chelan.  Put those in front of a 4 inch needlefish squid rig by Silver Horde, bait them with a piece of Northern Pikeminnow and scent everything with Pautzke’s Krill Juice to keep yourself consistently into the fish.  Silver Horde’s Kingfisher Lite spoons have also been productive.  These fish are completely jammed full of Mysis shrimp.  This in turn makes the meat especially delectable.  Trolling for Kokanee in the mid-depths has worked pretty good.  Your basic rig is a Mack’s Lure’s Double D Dodger in 00 to 0000 sizes with a short leader to a Mack’s Lure Mini Cha Cha Squidder.  Sizing up the hooks to #4 or even #2 might improve your fish retention percentage.  Bait the hooks with Pautzke’s Fire Corn to complete your ensemble.  Spot mid depth arches on your sonar.  We have found them from 50 feet deep to 175 feet deep.  Then troll just above them at about 1.1 mph.  Your fishing tip of the week is to use de icer to keep your gear functioning during these cold snaps.  Having reels lock up and downriggers stick are among the many “joys” of the season when a cold snap hits.  Sometimes a touch of oil on the rod eyes will help you out to.  The kid’s tip of the week is to dress them in layers and have warm liquids to fight off the winter chill.  Plan on shorter trips so the little ones will want to go fishing again.  The safety tip of the week is to leave your lower unit in the water a minute or two before starting the engine.  It will let any ice layer that has formed around the impeller to melt.  That way you won’t shred your impeller and have to pay for repairs.

 

11-24-15 - Terry Bright and Sara Hood of Elk Grove, CA with their mornings catch of Lake Chelan Mackinaw.

 

12/22/15:  Pepe' Hernandez of Blueberry Hills in Manson with son Emilio and their mornings catch of Kokanee and afternoon blast of Chukar.

 

12/08/15:  Pepe' Hernandez again with a 4.4 pound Chinook from the Mitchell Creek area. 

 

 

DARRELL & DAD’S FAMILY GUIDE SERVICE

509-687-0709

www.darrellanddads.com

check out our Facebook Page

 
 
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Happy New Year 2016

posted by Mike on 01/02/2016

All of the crew here at Ted's wishes each an every one of you a fantastic start to the new year. Now is the time to start planning your trips for the up and coming seasons. We are blessed here in the Pacific Northwest in that there is a wide array of fishing opprotunities. Most of us have our favorites that we focus our attention on. Perhaps it is a year that we should broaden our fishing horizons and try something out of our comfort zone! There is no lack of fisheries to try.

 

No matter what fishery is your favorite we hope that you have a fantastic year.

 

We would also like to thank all of you for the support that you showed us this past season.

Thanks

Mike, John, Ryan & Larry

Hood Canal & Portion Of Area 9 To Remain Open For Crab Until February 28th, 2016

posted by Mike on 12/28/2015

Sport crabbing season to remain open
in Hood Canal, part of Admiralty Inlet

 

 

OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers are extending the sport crabbing season in Hood Canal (Marine Area 12) and a portion of Admiralty Inlet (Marine Area 9) until Feb. 28. All other Puget Sound marine areas will close at 5 p.m. on Dec. 31, as scheduled.

The only portion of Admiralty Inlet that will remain open until Feb. 28 is the area north of the Hood Canal Bridge to the Foulweather Bluff to Olele Point line. The rest of Marine Area 9 will close Dec. 31, along with most other areas of Puget Sound. Those areas are scheduled to reopen next summer.

The department is extending the sport crab fishery in Hood Canal and a portion of Admiralty Inlet because there are plenty of crabs remaining in those areas, said Rich Childers, shellfish policy lead for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

“We’re seeing a lot of crab especially in the northern section of Hood Canal,” Childers said. 

Childers reminds sport crabbers that they’re required to submit crab catch reports to WDFW for the winter season by Feb. 1 – even if they did not catch any crab. Sport crabbers should be aware that if they fail to submit a winter catch report, they will receive a $10 fine when they purchase their 2016 crab endorsement.

“Catch data submitted by crabbers plays an important role in managing the Puget Sound crab fishery," Childers said. "We need to hear from everyone who was issued a winter catch card - including from those who didn't catch any crab.”

To submit catch reports, crabbers may send their catch record card to WDFW by mail or file their report on a special webpage on the department's licensing website. The mailing address is WDFW CRC Unit, 600 Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA 98501-1091.

The online reporting system will be available Jan. 1 through Feb. 1 at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/wdfw/puget_sound_crab_catch.html.

Crabbers will not be required to record crab on catch cards for the months of January and February 2016 for Hood Canal or the open section of Marine Area 9. However, crabbers must have in their possession a current shellfish license with a Puget Sound crab endorsement. WDFW staff will be conducting field-based surveys to estimate the recreational catch in Hood Canal and Admiralty Inlet for January and February.

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