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Reports

Puget Sound Ling Cod Fishing

posted by Mike on 05/03/2016

Ling cod season started this past Saturday May 1st here in Puget Sound. Reports have been a little on the slow side for the greatest numbers of angles that we have spoken to, though many have done quite well! We have until June 15th to chase these delictable table fare fish. Here in our section of Puget Sound there is not a great deal of ideal ling cod habitat and one has to be very concise and focus your fishing attention on the structure that holds these fish. In looking for good ling cod spots focus your attention upon areas that have good rocky habitat. If you have rocky habitat and vertical structure all the better! Look for the artifical reefs that have been put in place over the years. Don't overlook the kelp beds of the shallower 15 - 45 foot of water as the keep adhears to the rocky bottom and the kelp provides a good canopy of cover for the lings. Don't overlook small patches of rocky habitat as it is amazing how many lings can call a few bolders home.

 

There are lots of techniques for fishing ling and all of them are productive. The most popular is to fish a small live fish like a sole, sculpin, shiner perch or greenling. Ling cod find a live bait virtually irresistable. Lead head jigs with a 6 -8 inch grub tail, double tailed scampee or swim bait are good choices. Lead minnows are not to be overlooked either; such as a Point Wilson Dart, Megabait etc. . You can also fish a large herring in a blue or purple sized bait on a heavy mooching leader.

 

Make sure to fish within a few feet of the bottom. You have to put your bait or lure where they live!

Tags: Ling Cod

Coastal Razor Clam Digs May 6th - 12th

posted by Mike on 05/03/2016

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OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers have added four days of razor clam digging at Mocrocks to a previously scheduled opening at Long Beach to offer a full week of digging starting May 6.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the digs at Long Beach and Mocrocks after marine toxin tests showed the clams on those beaches are safe to eat.

The department added dates at Mocrocks after evaluating harvest levels and determining there are still clams available for digging, said Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager.

The upcoming dig is scheduled on the following dates, beaches, and low tides:

  • May 6, Friday, 6:51 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Long Beach
  • May 7, Saturday, 7:39 a.m.; -2.0 feet; Long Beach
  • May 8, Sunday, 8:26 a.m.; -2.1 feet; Long Beach
  • May 9, Monday, 9:14 a.m.; -1.9 feet; Mocrocks
  • May 10, Tuesday, 10:03 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Mocrocks
  • May 11, Wednesday, 10:55 a.m.; -0.9 feet; Mocrocks
  • May 12, Thursday, 11:49 a.m.; -0.3 feet; Mocrocks

Ayres recommends that diggers arrive at the beaches an hour or two before low tide for best results. However, digging is not allowed on any beach after noon with the exception of Mocrocks on May 12, when digging will be allowed for an extra hour, until 1 p.m., due to the later low tide, Ayres said.

Under state law, diggers are required to keep the first 15 clams they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2016-17 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

WDFW also is proposing three days of digging at Mocrocks and two days at Copalis later in the month. These will be the final days of digging on those two beaches this season, Ayres said. The department will announce whether the digs can proceed, pending the results of marine toxin tests, about a week before the digs are scheduled to start.

Below is a list of proposed digs, along with low tides and beaches:

  • May 20, Friday, 6:37 a.m.; -0.3 feet; Mocrocks, Copalis
  • May 21, Saturday, 7:12 a.m.; -0.6 feet; Mocrocks, Copalis
  • May 22, Sunday, 7:47 a.m.; -0.8 feet; Mocrocks

During all upcoming digs, state wildlife managers urge clam diggers to avoid disturbing snowy plovers and streaked horned larks by observing posted vehicle speed limits and avoiding nest sites. Both species nest in the soft, dry sand at Leadbetter Point on the Long Beach Peninsula.

The snowy plover is a small bird with gray wings and a white breast. The lark is a small bird with a pale yellow breast and brown back. Male larks have a black mask, breast band and “horns.” Both species are listed as “endangered” in the state and as “threatened” under the federal Endangered Species Act.

Puget Sound Salmon & Steelhead Fisheries, Puget Sound Streams and Some Lakes Closing To Fishing

posted by Mike on 04/30/2016

Several Puget Sound-area marine,
freshwater fisheries to close May 1

 

 

OLYMPIA – Five lakes and the lower sections of most rivers that flow into Puget Sound will close to all fishing beginning Sunday, May 1, when salmon and steelhead fishing also closes in the Sound.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) officials said today they are closing state fisheries in waters where salmon migrate while they work to secure the federal permit required to hold salmon fisheries in Puget Sound. Typically, the state and tribes jointly obtain the federal permit for the Sound, where some fish stocks are protected under the federal Endangered Species Act. The current permit expires April 30.

However, many fishing opportunities remain available in and around Puget Sound. WDFW has posted a list of rivers and sections of rivers that are open to fishing on its webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/pugetsound_salmon_update. That page also has a list of Puget Sound area lakes that are closed to all fishing.

“Since we didn’t reach an agreement with treaty tribal co-managers on this year’s Puget Sound salmon fisheries, we have to close fishing in areas where we know salmon will be,” said Ron Warren, head of WDFW’s Fish Program.

For the next few months, those areas include several Puget Sound-region lakes and the lower reaches of streams where salmon smolts will travel on their way to the Sound.

Lakes that will close May 1 to all fishing include Lake Washington and Lake Sammamish (King County), Monte Cristo Lake (Snohomish County), Lake Cushman (Mason County), and Barney Lake (Skagit County).

Examples of rivers where at least sections, if not all, are closed to fishing include the Skagit, Stillaguamish and Snohomish rivers, north of Seattle. Today’s action also applies to Puget Sound-area rivers that typically open to fishing in early June, though fishery managers will be evaluating those rivers to determine whether any can open on schedule.

All non-tribal commercial and recreational Puget Sound salmon and steelhead fisheries, including those in Marine Area 13 and year-round fishing piers around Puget Sound, will close May 1 to salmon and steelhead fishing until further notice. More detailed information about marine area closures can be found online at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/.

The department is working with federal authorities and doing everything possible to re-open Puget Sound marine and freshwater fisheries, Warren said.

“We regret having to close these fisheries,” Warren said. “We know this is a hardship on many communities around Puget Sound and disappoints many anglers.”

In the meantime, Warren urged anglers to consider trying new fishing waters, emphasizing that most Puget Sound area lowland lakes remain open to fishing. 

Also, he said recreational fisheries in Puget Sound marine areas that are not affected by the closures include bottomfish, such as lingcod, Pacific cod and cabezon, as well as sea-run cutthroat trout and halibut. These fisheries are covered under a separate permit and are open as scheduled. Anglers should check the 2015-16 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, available online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/, for details. 

Salmon fishing will continue as scheduled in the Columbia River and Washington’s ocean waters and north coastal rivers. Information on those fisheries can be found on WDFW’s webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/.

WDFW Hatcheries Releasing Steelhead Under Newly Approved Federal Permits

posted by Mike on 04/22/2016

WDFW hatcheries releasing steelhead
under newly approved federal permits

 

OLYMPIA – State fishery managers have begun releasing more than 500,000 juvenile steelhead from five state fish hatcheries into Puget Sound rivers after receiving word from NOAA-Fisheries that those facilities meet federal environmental standards.

For the past two years, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has released steelhead from those five hatcheries into area lakes to ensure they wouldn’t interfere with wild steelhead protected by the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA).

That action resulted from a legal agreement with the Wild Fish Conservancy, which stipulated that WDFW would not release steelhead smolts into area rivers until NOAA-Fisheries determined that its hatchery operations comply with the federal law.

Now that WDFW has received the necessary federal permits, the department is again releasing smolts that will migrate to the ocean and return as adult steelhead after two years, said Kelly Cunningham, deputy assistant director of WDFW’s Fish Program.

“We are pleased that NOAA-Fisheries agrees our hatchery plans are scientifically sound,” Cunningham said. “This means that we can again produce fish for harvest in fisheries throughout Puget Sound.”

WDFW hatcheries in northern Puget Sound currently releasing hatchery smolts include:

  • Wallace Creek, 27,600
  • Reiter Ponds, 140,000
  • Whitehorse, 130,000
  • Kendall Creek, 150,000
  • Tokul Creek, 74,000

NOAA-Fisheries also approved a permit allowing the Dungeness Hatchery to release 10,000 steelhead smolts on the Olympic Peninsula, but those releases will take place in mid-May due to the timing of the run, Cunningham said.

WDFW Seeking Federal Permit For Puget Sound Fisheries After Talks With Tribes End

posted by Mike on 04/22/2016

 

WDFW to seek federal permit for Puget Sound
fisheries after talks with tribes end

 

OLYMPIA – State fishery managers have decided to separately secure the federal permit required to hold salmon fisheries this season in Puget Sound.

The decision was made Tuesday after negotiations over salmon seasons with tribal leaders again came to an impasse. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and the tribes last week could not reach an agreement during the annual season-setting process.

“We had hoped additional conversations with the tribes would result in fisheries that were agreeable to both parties,” said Jim Unsworth, director of the department. “Unfortunately, that did not happen, but our door remains open to further discussions.”

WDFW officials said it is uncertain whether the department will have the permit in time to hold recreational and non-tribal commercial salmon fisheries in Puget Sound through much of the season. The permit is necessary to hold fisheries in Puget Sound where there are fish stocks protected under the federal Endangered Species Act.

Tribal fishery managers are expected to separately seek federal permits from NOAA Fisheries for salmon fisheries in Puget Sound.

Over the course of negotiations, the department proposed fisheries that maintained some fishing opportunities and met conservation objectives, said Ron Warren, head of WDFW’s Fish Program.

“This isn’t the outcome we had hoped for, but we will do our best to obtain a federal permit as quickly as possible,” Warren said.

7th Annual Lake Stevens Kokanee Derby Tickets - Avaiable Now

posted by Mike on 04/18/2016

We have the derby tickets on hand and ready to sell. The price is still $20.00 for those 15 and up. Kids 14 and under are "FREE". Don't forget to mark your calendar!

Here's a little run down on the prizes:

 

Biggest Kokanee

1st Place $1,000.00  Sponsored by Dick Nite & Gregs

2nd Place $500.00 Sponsored by Ted's Sports Center

3rd Place $250.00 Sponsored by John's Sporting Goods

4th Place $100.00 Sponsored by Triangle Bait and Tackle

Biggest 10 Fish Boat Limit

1st Place $500.00 Gift Card Sponsored by Three Rivers Marine & Tackle

 

Kids Derby Prizes

1st Place $100.00

2nd Place $75.00

3rd Place $50.00

First Place Fish Must Be A Kokanee. 2nd And 3rd place can be any species caught in Lake Stevens the day of the derby.

 

Ticket Locations

Greg's Custom Rods

Joh'ns Sporting Goods

Ted's Sports Center

Triangle Bait & Tackle

Three Rivers Marine & Tackle

Holiday Sports

 

Coastal Salmon Seasons & Columbia River For 2016

posted by Mike on 04/16/2016

  
Washington's ocean waters: The Pacific Fisheries Management Council approved a recreational chinook catch quota of 35,000 fish, which is 29,000 fish decline from 2015's quota of 64,000 chinook. The PFMC, which establishes fishing seasons in ocean waters three to 200 miles off the Pacific coast, also adopted a quota of 18,900 coho for this year's recreational ocean fishery – about 131,900 fish fewer than last year's quota (150,800 coho).  
 
Recreational ocean salmon fisheries for chinook will be open daily beginning July 1 in all four marine areas. Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco) will close Aug. 31 while the other three marine areas will close Aug. 21. The areas could close earlier if the catch quota is met.  
 
Anglers will be required to release coho salmon in marine areas 2-4 but can retain hatchery coho in Marine Area 1. Anglers will have a daily limit of one salmon in Marine Area 2. In Marine Area 1 anglers can retain two salmon, only one of which can be chinook. Areas 3 and 4 have a two-salmon daily limit.  
 
 
Columbia River: The popular Buoy 10 fishery near the mouth of the Columbia River will be announced early next week. Fishery managers from Washington and Oregon are still working out the details of the fishery, which is expected to benefit from a large run of chinook salmon to the river this year.
 
For the third-straight year, during fall fisheries, anglers fishing from the same boat may continue fishing for salmon until all anglers have reached their daily limits in the following areas:
•    The mainstem Columbia River from the Rocky Point/Tongue Point line upstream to Lewis River will be open for hatchery coho from Aug. 1 through Dec. 31. Anglers will be allowed to retain one adult chinook as part of their two-adult daily limit from Aug. 1 through Sep. 14. During Sep. 8 through Sep. 14, adult chinook retention is restricted to hatchery chinook only. From Oct. 1 through Dec. 31, anglers can retain two adult chinook daily.  
•    The Lewis River upstream to Steamboat Landing Park dock/Marker #50, near Washougal, will be open Aug. 1 through Dec. 31 for chinook and hatchery coho, with a daily limit of two adult salmon.  
•    Columbia River anglers are reminded that retention of sockeye and chum salmon is prohibited during the fall season.
The summer season on the mainstem Columbia River from the Astoria-Megler Bridge upstream to Bonneville Dam will be open from June 16 through July 31 for hatchery summer chinook and sockeye. The daily limit will be two adult salmonids (chinook and steelhead must be adipose fin-clipped). All sockeye are considered adults in the daily limit.
 
The summer season from Bonneville Dam upstream to the Highway 395 Bridge will be open from June 16 through July 31 for hatchery summer chinook and sockeye. The daily limit will be two adult salmonids (chinook and steelhead must be adipose finclipped). All sockeye are considered adults in the daily limit.   
 
 


   

Chehalis River Opens For Spring Chinook April 16th Through June 30th, 2016

posted by Mike on 04/16/2016

Chehalis River spring chinook fishery opens April 16

 

Action: Opens Chehalis River to spring chinook fishing.

Effective dates: 12:01 a.m. April 16 through 11:59 p.m. June 30, 2016.

Location: Chehalis River, from the mouth (Hwy 101 Bridge) to the Hwy 6 Bridge in the town of Adna, Grays Harbor/Thurston/Lewis counties.

Reason for action: This rule change opens a fishing opportunity recently agreed to by the state and coastal tribes during the salmon season-setting process.

Other Information: Daily limit of one salmon. Trout and gamefish fisheries remain closed until the first day in June.

Information Contact: Mike Scharpf, Region 6 (360) 249-1205.

Lower Yakima River To Open For Spring Chinook April 29th Through June 15th

posted by Mike on 04/16/2016

Lower Yakima River to open for spring chinook fishing

 

Action: Open the lower Yakima River to fishing for spring chinook salmon

Species affected: Chinook salmon

Dates: April 29 through June 15, 2016

Location: From the Hwy. 240 bridge in Richland (river mile 2.1) to the Grant Avenue Bridge in Prosser (river mile 47.0) approximately 1,000 feet downstream of Prosser Dam.

Reason for action: Yakama Nation (YN) and WDFW fishery managers are forecasting a total return of 4,610 adult spring chinook to the Yakima River in 2016 (3,100 wild and 1,510 hatchery fish), representing 55% of the recent 10-year (2006-2015) average adult return of 8,320 spring chinook. Consequently, the hatchery adult daily limit has been reduced from two to one fish this year.

Other information:

Daily limit of two (2) chinook, including one (1) adult hatchery chinook. Minimum size 12 inches. Hatchery salmon are identified by a missing adipose fin and a healed scar in the location of the missing fin. Wild adult chinook (adipose fin intact; greater than 24 inches total length) must be immediately released unharmed and cannot be removed from the water prior to release.

Once the adult portion of the daily limit is retained, continuing to fish for salmon (i.e., hatchery or wild jacks) is prohibited.

Terminal gear is restricted to two, single-point, barbless hooks with a hook gap from point to shank of 3/4 inch or less when fishing for salmon. Use of bait is allowed.

For the duration of this salmon fishery, the Yakima River adjacent to the USBR Chandler Powerhouse/Pumping Station is closed to all fishing from the WDFW white markers 200" downstream of the spillway chute to the power line crossing immediately upstream of the powerhouse.

The use of two (2) fishing poles is permitted during the salmon fishery provided the participating angler has purchased a "Two-Pole Endorsement" (in addition to the freshwater fishing license and Columbia River salmon/steelhead endorsement).

Fishing for steelhead remains closed. All steelhead (rainbow trout greater than 20" in total length) must be immediately released unharmed and cannot be removed from the water prior to release.

A Columbia River Salmon/Steelhead Endorsement is required to participate in this fishery.

Information contacts: Paul Hoffarth, District 4 Fish Biologist, (509) 545-2284 (Pasco) or John Easterbrooks, Regional Fish Program Manager, (509) 457-9330 (Yakima).

 

Ted's has lots of gear for this fishery. Stop in and we'll be glad to help you out.

No Agreement Out Of North Of Falcon Meetings For Puget Sound Salmon Seasons

posted by Mike on 04/15/2016

Salmon seasons set for ocean, CR;
state, tribes unable to reach agreement on Puget Sound

OLYMPIA – Anglers will have opportunities to fish for salmon in the ocean and Columbia River this year, although recreational and non-tribal commercial salmon fisheries in Puget Sound may be closed through much of the season.

After lengthy negotiations, state and tribal fishery managers could not reach an agreement on salmon-fishing seasons in Puget Sound. An agreement must be reached in the next few weeks or the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and treaty tribes in western Washington will each need to secure separate federal permits required to hold fisheries in Puget Sound waters where there are protected fish stocks.

That decision was made yesterday at the Pacific Fishery Management Council’s meeting in Vancouver, Wash. Salmon fishing seasons for Washington’s ocean waters and the Columbia River were adopted during the federal panel’s meeting. A summary of those fisheries is available on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/attach/apr1516a.pdf

Jim Unsworth, WDFW director, said potentially forgoing salmon seasons in Puget Sound isn’t a decision the department took lightly.

“We realize that closing salmon fishing in Puget Sound for the foreseeable future is not only disappointing but is detrimental to many communities across the region,” he said. “As we work to secure the necessary federal permit, we hope to continue discussions with the tribes. I believe co-management can work, and we will do our part to improve the process of setting salmon seasons in Washington.”

This is the first time the state and tribes have not reached an agreement on salmon fishing seasons while working as co-managers, which began about 30 years ago. In previous years, the co-managers have been authorized to fish for salmon under a joint federal permit.

Ron Warren, head of WDFW’s Fish Program, said the department will begin working with NOAA Fisheries to secure a federal permit for salmon fisheries in Puget Sound. However, it is uncertain the department will receive federal authorization in time to hold salmon fisheries this summer, he said.

“We knew setting salmon-fishing seasons would be challenging this year due to the poor forecast for coho,” Warren said. “Our staff worked really hard to put forward a set of proposed fisheries that met agreed-to conservation goals. Unfortunately, we were not able to reach an agreement.”

About 256,000 coho are expected to return to Puget Sound in 2016. That’s about one-third the size of run predicted in 2015.

During the salmon season-setting process, state fishery managers consulted with numerous members of the department’s Puget Sound sportfishing advisory groups, who supported the department’s decision.

Puget Sound marine and fresh water areas that currently are open to salmon fishing – including marine areas 5, 11, 12 and 13 – will close to fishing May 1, if not scheduled to close earlier in the 2015-2016 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet.

More Coastal Razor Clam Digging - May 20th through May 28th

posted by Mike on 04/15/2016

Razor clam dig begins April 20, more proposed in May

OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers today approved nine days of razor clam digging beginning April 20 on the first of three ocean beaches.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams on those beaches are safe to eat.

Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager, said the department added two days of digging at Copalis, which was not originally included in the list of tentative digs previously announced by the agency. The dig was added after catch estimates indicated that there are still clams available for harvest to allow for two weekday openings at the beach, he said.

Ayres recommends that diggers arrive at the beaches an hour or two before low tide for best results. However, digging is not allowed on any beach after noon.

The upcoming dig is scheduled on the following dates, beaches, and low tides:

  • April 20, Wednesday, 6:25 a.m.; 0.6 feet; Long Beach
  • April 21, Thursday, 7:01 a.m.; 0.2 feet; Long Beach
  • April 22, Friday, 7:35 a.m.; 0.0 feet; Long Beach
  • April 23, Saturday, 8:08 a.m.; -0.2 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • April 24, Sunday, 8:42 a.m.; -0.2 feet; Long Beach
  • April 25, Monday, 9:18 a.m.; -0.2 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • April 26, Tuesday, 9:56 a.m.; -0.1 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks, Copalis
  • April 27, Wednesday, 10:39 a.m.; 0.1 feet; Long Beach
  • April 28, Thursday, 11:28 a.m.; 0.3 feet; Long Beach 

Under state law, diggers are required to keep the first 15 clams they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2016-17 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Ayres notes that Twin Harbors Beach remains closed to razor clam digging due to elevated levels of domoic acid, a natural toxin produced by certain types of marine algae. Toxin levels at Twin Harbors are above the threshold (20 parts per million) set by public health officials.

Tentative razor clam dates in May 2016

Meanwhile, WDFW has also proposed additional digs in May, pending the results of future marine toxin tests:

  • May 6, Friday, 6:51 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Long Beach
  • May 7, Saturday, 7:39 a.m.; -2.0 feet; Long Beach
  • May 8, Sunday, 8:26 a.m.; -2.1 feet; Long Beach

Ayres said the department will consider adding digging days at Mocrocks in May after reviewing harvest levels from the April dig.

During all upcoming digs, state wildlife managers urge clam diggers to avoid disturbing snowy plovers and streaked horned larks by observing posted vehicle speed limits and avoiding nest sites. Both species nest in the soft, dry sand at Leadbetter Point on the Long Beach Peninsula.

The snowy plover is a

Two Days Of Sturgeon Fishing In Bonneville Pool

posted by Mike on 04/13/2016

Bonneville Pool will open two days to white sturgeon retention

Action: The summer-season recreational fishery in Bonneville Reservoir opens to white sturgeon retention for two days in June.

Effective dates: Saturday June 18 and Friday July 1, 2016

Species affected: White sturgeon between 38-inches and 54-inches fork length

Location: The Columbia River and adjacent tributaries from Bonneville Dam upstream to the sturgeon spawning sanctuary boundary located 1.8 miles downstream of The Dalles Dam, from the east (upstream) dock at the Port of The Dalles boat ramp straight across to a boundary marker on the Washington shore.

Reason for action: Establishes a summer white sturgeon retention period in Bonneville Reservoir. Around 168 fish remain available for harvest from the 325 fish total guideline. This balance allows for a summer retention season. This decision was made April 7, 2016 at a joint Washington-Oregon public hearing.

Other information: The annual harvest guideline for Bonneville Pool was reduced from 1,100 fish to 325 fish in response to a decline in the population of legal-size sturgeon. All other permanent regulations remain in effect. Catch-and-release fishing for sturgeon is allowed, except the spawning sanctuary is closed to all sturgeon angling during May through July. The Columbia River and adjacent tributaries between The Dalles and McNary dams remain open to sturgeon retention until respective harvest guidelines for each reservoir are reached. The spawning sanctuaries from the Highway 395/I-82 Bridge upstream to McNary Dam and from the Rufus grain elevator upstream to John Day Dam close to all sturgeon fishing May 1 through July 31.

Information contact: Dennis Gilliland, (360) 906-6733.

2016 Lake Stevens Kokanee Derby Set For May 21st

posted by Mike on 04/13/2016

Saturday, May 21st is the day for the 7th Annual Lake Stevens Kokanee Derby. We'll have more information and tickets in the near future. The fishing has been quite good at the present time and the fish are averaging larger than last year. So mark the date for derby!

Lake Stevens Kokanee - April13th, 2016

posted by Mike on 04/12/2016

The kokanee fishing in Lake Stevens has been getting better every day. We are now starting to hear of some limits being caught. Fish have been averaging bigger this year with lots of fish around 12 inches with an odd fish to 15. The fish are in good shape and quite robust. Most all of the action has been in the top 20 feet of water. Guys have been finding fish right on the surface first thing in the morning and flat lining techniques have been very productive. As the su has come up the guys are going deeper but 20 feet seems to be about the deepest folks are finding fish. Fishing should only improve in the upcoming weeks.

Kids Trout Fishing Class

posted by Mike on 04/12/2016

Just a quick reminder that the Kids Trout Fishing Class will be held tomorrow April 13th at Silver Hall at Thorton A Sullivan Park at Silver Lake from 6-8PM. Make sure to register with Everett Parks Department at (425) 257-8300 ext2. This is a great way to introduce kids to the sport of fishing. The guys and gals from the Everett Salmon & Steelhead Youth Organization will be there to tell you the ins & outs of trout fishing.

Spring Chinook Fishery To Close On Columbia - One Day Early

posted by Mike on 04/07/2016

 

Spring chinook fishery closes pending run update on lower Columbia River

 

OLYMPIA – The first phase of the popular sport fishery for spring chinook salmon on the lower Columbia River will close at the end of the day Friday, April 8, one day earlier than previously expected.

 

Fishery managers from Washington and Oregon agreed to close the fishery based on projections that the catch of upriver chinook salmon will reach the initial 7,515-fish harvest guideline a day ahead of schedule.

 

The closure includes fishing for salmon, steelhead and shad in the 145-mile section of the Columbia River downstream from Bonneville Dam. It does not affect fisheries upriver from the dam, or any tributaries to the Columbia River.

 

Fisheries in the lower Columbia River could reopen later this spring if the number of spring chinook passing the dam in the coming weeks reaches or exceeds preseason expectations, said Ron Roler, Columbia River policy coordinator for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

 

Roler said that decision will be based on an updated run-size projection, expected in late April or early May. Prior to the season, fishery managers anticipated that 188,800 upriver spring chinook will return to the Columbia River this year.

 

“For the next few weeks, all eyes will be on the number of spring chinook passing Bonneville Dam,” Roler said. “Fishing has been good so far this year, but the count of chinook salmon at the dam lagged until just a week or two ago. The next few weeks will tell the tale or whether we can reopen the fishery.”

 

As in years past, Washington and Oregon manage the fishery with a 30 percent “buffer” on the upriver chinook forecast until the results of the in-season run update are known, Roler said.

“This strategy is designed to prevent overharvesting the run,” Roler said. “If the fish return at or above expectations, we can then look to providing additional days of fishing later in the spring.”

 

 

 

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Marrine Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet) Closing Early For Salmon Fishing

posted by Mike on 04/06/2016

Salmon season closes April 11 in Marine Area 9

 

Action: Closes fishing for salmon in Marine Area 9.

Effective Date: April 11 through April 15, 2016.

Species affected: Salmon.

Location: Marine Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet) within Puget Sound.

Reason for action: Before the salmon fishing season started, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and tribal co-managers agreed to a limited number (4,729) of chinook encounters (retaining or releasing fish) that anglers are allowed in Marine Areas 9. Preliminary estimates indicate that anglers will reach the limit for chinook encounters by April 11. WDFW is closing salmon fishing to ensure compliance with conservation objectives and agreed-to management plans.

Other information: Salmon fishing will remain open in other areas, including Marine Areas 5, 11, 12 and 13. Check the sport fishing rules pamphlet for details: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/.

Information contact: Ryan Lothrop, (360) 902-2808.

 

With the closure of Marine Area 9 this will be the last of our salmon fishing in our local marine areas. We will not know what sort of salmon seasons we will have this summer until the North of Falcon meetings are completed this month. I don't think we will have much!

Lake Stevens Kokanee - April 2, 2016

posted by Mike on 04/02/2016

There have been a fair number of anglers with cabin fever that have been testing the waters of Lake Stevens recently seeing if they can scratch up some early season kokanee. I would not say that the fishing has been red hot but at least there are a few fish being caught the past few weeks. We have spoke with a number of our customers that have caught fish recently with the best catch being nine between two anglers. The fish that we have seen are no trophies by any means but respectable 10 - 11 inch fish. The upper 10 feet of the water column is where they have been found, which is what we expect this time of the year. Typical kokanee gear has been the ticket with a dodger trailing a blade / bead combination with double hooks baited with shoe peg corn marinated with your favorite sauce. Fish slowly from .9 to 1.1 mph. The fish have been a little spread out recently and will school up a little later in the season.

 

Being a local fishery, this is one that you can do if you have a few hours to spare on a weekend morning with the kids. I am sure they are itching to get out and do something with the nicer weather we have recently had. Many of them will have Spring break from school over the next couple of weeks.

 

Ted's has a large selection of kokanee gear in stock with more coming in every week. There are quite a few new items to the kokanee scene recently especially the new "Hyper-Vis" Kokanee Dodgers! These really do stand out in a little bit of sun light! Stop by and take a look!
 

Additional Razor Clam Digs Scheduled May 3rd - April 12th

posted by Mike on 04/02/2016

W approves razor clam digs for beginning of April, more proposed for late April

OLYMPIA – State shellfish managers today approved 10 days of razor clam digging beginning Sunday on three ocean beaches. 

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the digs after marine toxin tests showed the clams on those beaches are safe to eat.

Diggers should be aware that the opening switches from evening to morning tides beginning April 7, said Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager.

Ayres also noted that razor clam diggers age 15 or older need to have a 2016-17 fishing license to participate in the upcoming dig, since the new license year begins April 1. New licenses are available online (https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/) and from license dealers throughout the state.

The upcoming dig is scheduled on the following dates, beaches, and low tides:

  • April 3, Sunday, 4:13 p.m.; 0.5 feet; Long Beach
  • April 4, Monday, 5:04 p.m.; 0.1 feet; Long Beach
  • April 5, Tuesday, 5:51 p.m.; 0.0 feet; Long Beach
  • April 6, Wednesday, 6:36 p.m.; 0.0 feet; Long Beach
     
  • April 7, Thursday, 7:07 a.m.; -0.6 feet; Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • April 8, Friday, 7:54 a.m.; -1.1 feet; Long Beach, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • April 9, Saturday, 8:42 a.m.; -1.3 feet; Long Beach, Copalis
  • April 10, Sunday, 9:32 a.m.; -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • April 11, Monday, 10:23 a.m.; -0.9 feet; Long Beach
  • April 12, Tuesday, 11:19 a.m.; -0.4 feet; Long Beach

Under state law, diggers are required to keep the first 15 clams they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container.

The dig coincides with the annual Long Beach razor clam festival, scheduled April 9 and 10, Ayres said. Digging at Long Beach will be limited only to the days listed. The beach had been open daily in February and March.

“After a late start to the season, we have tried to provide as much digging as possible while still conserving our razor clam populations,” Ayres said.

WDFW delayed the razor clam season due to elevated levels of domoic acid, a natural toxin produced by certain types of marine algae. Toxin levels at Twin Harbors Beach remain above the threshold (20 parts per million) set by public health officials. The beach is closed to razor clam digging.

“Razor clams at Twin Harbors had the highest levels of domoic acid during the peak of the harmful algae bloom in 2015,” Ayres said. “It is taking longer for clams there to rid themselves of the toxin.”

It's uncertain whether Twin Harbors will open this spring for razor clam digging, Ayres said. WDFW continues to monitor toxin levels on all Washington beaches and will announce openings on the department’s razor clam webpage.

During all upcoming digs, state wildlife managers urge clam diggers to avoid disturbing snowy plovers and streaked horned larks by observing posted vehicle speed limits and avoiding nest sites. Both species nest in the soft, dry sand at Leadbetter Point on the Long Beach Peninsula.

The snowy plover is a small bird with gray wings and a white breast. The lark is a small bird with a pale yellow breast and brown back. Male larks have a black mask, breast band and “horns.” Both species are listed as “endangered” in the state and as “threatened” under the federal Endangered Species Act.

More proposed digs in late April
WDFW has also proposed razor clam digs at three beaches in late April, subject to the results of additional marine toxin tests. Shellfish managers will announce a final decision on those digs about a week before they are set to begin.

WDFW has proposed digs on the following beaches and tides:

  • April 20, Wednesday, 6:25 a.m.; 0.6 feet; Long Beach
  • April 21, Thursday, 7:01 a.m.; 0.2 feet; Long Beach
  • April 22, Friday, 7:35 a.m.; 0.0 feet; Long Beach
  • April 23, Saturday, 8:08 a.m.; -0.2 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • April 24, Sunday, 8:42 a.m.; -0.2 feet; Long Beach
  • April 25, Monday, 9:18 a.m.; -0.2 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • April 26, Tuesday, 9:56 a.m.; -0.1 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • April 27, Wednesday, 10:39 a.m.; 0.1 feet; Long Beach
  • April 28, Thursday, 11:28 a.m.; 0.3 feet; Long Beach 

 

Early Salmon Closure For Marine Areas 8-1 & 8.2 (Deception Pass, Hope Island, & Skagit Bay - Port Susan and Gardner Bay) Sunday, April 3rd Will Be The Last Day

posted by Mike on 04/02/2016

Once again we have received a last minute salmon closure notice. It always amazes me how they anounce these notices after WDFW has closed for the weekend. Wonder Why?

Salmon season closes April 4 in Marine Areas 8-1 and 8-2

Action: Closes fishing for salmon in Marine Area 8-1 and 8-2.

Effective Date: April 4 through April 30, 2016.

Species affected: Salmon.

Location: Marine Area 8-1 (Deception Pass, Hope Island, and Skagit Bay) and 8-2 (Ports Susan and Gardner) within Puget Sound.

Reason for action: Before the salmon fishing season started, WDFW and tribal co-managers agreed to a limited number (5,811) of chinook encounters (retaining or releasing fish) that anglers are allowed in Marine Areas 8-1 and 8-2 combined. Preliminary estimates indicate that anglers will reach the limit for chinook encounters by April 4. WDFW is closing salmon fishing to ensure compliance with conservation objectives and agreed-to management plans.

Other information: Salmon fishing will remain open in other areas, including marine areas 5, 9, 11, 12 and 13. Check the sport fishing rules pamphlet for details: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/.

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